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Could you help me with this please?

1 He has so many ways of dressing. He doesn't have the same style/look all the time. Sometimes he's classy, others he's got a dirty look to him. He can dress classily just as he can dress comfortably.

2 I don't rememebr exactly but I have seen there is an application which does the functionality. (Functionality isn't the right word???)

3 This IPOD belongs to an american or someone whose american hiphop repertoire is vast/who has an extensive rap repertoire.

Thank you
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Comments  
#2 stumps me completely.
I have been stumped, period!
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My versions are not the only correct ones. They are simply what I might say to communicate what you have written.
alc24He has so many ways of dressing. He doesn't have the same style/look all the time. Sometimes he's classy, others he's got a dirty look to him. He can dress classily just as he can dress comfortably.
He has a lot of different ways of dressing. He doesn't always dress in the same style. Sometimes he wears classy clothes; at other times he dresses down for a grungy look. He can dress with an emphasis on class or comfort.
alc24 I don't rememebr exactly but I have seen there is an application which does the functionality.
I don't remember exactly (what it was), but (it seems to me that) I've seen an application which has the same functionality.
alc24This IPOD belongs to an american or someone whose american hiphop repertoire is vast/who has an extensive rap repertoire.
If this IPOD doesn't belong to an American, it must belong to someone with an extensive rap repertoire.

CJ
Thank you so much,

one thing.

For 1 the last sentence, can you say
"He can dress classily just as he can dress down"

thanks
What I would find more natural is: He wears dressy and casual clothes equally well.
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alc24For 1 the last sentence, can you say
"He can dress classily just as he can dress down"
The problem is not just as. That's fine. The problem is the word classily -- a very awkward and unidiomatic word. I don't think most people would choose that word. Philip's solution (above) is much better.

CJ
Hello CJ,

I had one question please?

Can you use "JUST AS"

He does A like he does B. (both in the same manner)

He does A , like he does B. (it's as true that he does A as it is true that he does B.)

So could you say

He can dress in a classy way just like he can dress comfortably.

Could you come up with a sentence that incorportates JUST LIKE like that but that's natural as well.

Is this possible


Your breath always smells just like my feet always smell. (a joke)

Is that natural?

One last thing:

Can you tell me if this is correct, natural and the right tense?


1 I got there just as the train was pulling in.

2 The glass shattered just as/when it hit the ground.

Thank you so much CJ for everything.

alc24Can you use "JUST AS"

He does A like he does B. (both in the same manner)
He does A , like he does B. (it's as true that he does A as it is true that he does B.)
I don't sense that you can make this kind of distinction with a comma. I've never seen it like that.

You can use the comma, but I don't think your reader will necessarily sense the difference you're trying to show. The same goes for sentences with "just as". I would not use a comma for either meaning.

He does A just as he does B. (Both in the same manner OR simply he does both. The reader has to rely on context to understand which is meant.)

CJ
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