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Do you usually say out 'at 4 pm' or 'at 4 in the evening/afternoon'?

Example,

I will meet you tomorrow at 4 pm/in the evening/in the afternoon

By the way, is 4 considered afternoon or evening?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
why do you say it is "at 8 in the evening"? I can understand if you think of summer time but during winter, the sun sets at 5 or 6 pm the latest. Is this a common expression when used with time, so you will never say "at 11 at night" even though it is clearly at night?
IMO, 'night' cannot be used because 'night' is used when you are going home. For example, you'll say, 'Good night' when you are leaving for home after going out with someone.
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Can a native speaker please verify this? So, a native speaker would say "I will find you tomorrow at 11 in the evening" instead of "I will find you tomorrow at 11 at night", is this right?
I'd say,
I'll meet you tomorrow night at 11. (not find, by the way)

CJ
New2grammar
Can a native speaker please verify this? So, a native speaker would say "I will find you tomorrow at 11 in the evening" instead of "I will find you tomorrow at 11 at night", is this right?

Hi CJ

1. Just to confirm: We can't say, "I will meet you tomorrow at 11 at night" , as suggested by New2grammar, can we?

2. What about "ll meet you tomorrow at 8 at night"?
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I think you're trying to force this into a rule, and it's a bit more flexible than that.

Where there is a possible confusion about which time you mean, you would add something to indicate if it's the earlier or later time. We would tend to use "afternoon" for times up to about 5 o'clock (when lots of people finish work), then "evening" after that. However, if it's quite late on in the evening, we might tend to say "night" instead - depending on whether we wanted to emphasise how late it was. For me, I'd tend to say "I got to the party about 11 in the evening" but "He rang me at 11 at night and woke me up". It's a personal choice, rather than a rule.
It's a personal choice, rather than a rule. And a logical explanation.
Hmm. I had posted, but it didn't "stick."

Here's one way to look at it: "evening" is when you're still doing stuff. You'd say a play has an afternoon and evening performance, not a "night" performance unless it's some bizarre midnight showing (like Rocky Horror).

In the winter, 5 p.m. might be evening - but in the summer, it's late afternoon. There's not a sharp dividing line.

When I leave work, I may wish my colleagues "Have a good night" but I'm more likely to say "Have a good evening."
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1. Just to confirm: We can't say, "I will meet you tomorrow at 11 at night" , as suggested by New2grammar, can we?

We can say that, but it's clumsy. Until they become more proficient, non-native speakers tend to use phrases that are correct but not idiomatic, such as today in the morning instead of the more idiomatic this morning, or tomorrow at night instead of tomorrow night.

2. What about "ll meet you tomorrow at 8 at night"?

Again correct, but the opportunity to use idiomatic patterns such as tomorrow night is again ignored in this version.

CJ
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