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Hi,

I have two questions:

1) Is it correct to say, "a piece of knowledge"?

2) Could you come up with a sentence in which "information" is used as a countable noun with an adjective?

Thank you,
M
Comments  
mitsuwao231) Is it correct to say, "a piece of knowledge"?
Not really.
These are common collocations:

a body of knowledge
a level of knowledge
a lack of knowledge
some bits of knowledge
areas of knowledge
forms of knowledge
an iota of knowledge (ie. He hasn't an iota of knowledge on the subject. )
mitsuwao232) Could you come up with a sentence in which "information" is used as a countable noun with an adjective?
No. Information is a collective noun. It is not countable. You might find it used in that way on some Google sites, but those sentences will not be written in standard English.
mitsuwao231) Is it correct to say, "a piece of knowledge"? no
2) Could you come up with a sentence in which "information" is used as a countable noun with an adjective?
"information" is not countable.We talk about 'pieces of information'.
'That's an important piece of information.'
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Thank you for the replies.

Is it wrong to say, "a kind of information" like "a valuable kind of information"?

What kind of ground rule can I rely on in order to apply the grammar below? Common sense and contexts in the end?

<a> (longman dictionary)
used before nouns that are usually uncountable when other information about the quality, feeling etc is added by anadjective, phrase, or clause:
- Candidates must have a good knowledge of chemistry.

Thank you,

M
Is it wrong to say, "a kind of information" like "a valuable kind of information"? That's not natural. Just say 'valuable information'.
What kind of ground rule can I rely on in order to apply the grammar below? Common sense and contexts in the end?
(longman dictionary)
What is???? used before nouns that are usually uncountable when other information about the quality, feeling etc is added by anadjective, phrase, or clause:
- Candidates must have a good knowledge of chemistry.
a correct sentence
mitsuwao23 it wrong to say, "a kind of information" like "a valuable kind of information"?
That's OK because the article is modifying "kind"

The amount of information can also be expressed in various ways:

He hasn't an iota of information to back him up.
He had reams of information to support his argument.
The investigator has a vast quantity of reliable information on the case.
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Thank you for the replies,

So, "a valuable kind of information" is kind of acceptable, although it sounds unnatural even to me. (I couldn't come up with a good adjective.)

I thought "a" could mean "a kind of" in general. I suppose you say "a cheese" to mean "a kind of cheese" but it seems this usage can be applied the particular nouns, not all the nouns.

M
AlpheccaStars,

Sorry for being persistent again but what the definition of collective nouns? I googled it but couldn't tell whether it is a collective noun or not.

Also, do you think "advice" is a collective noun?

Thank you,

M