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Hi teachers,

I've quoted one of the threads with a few questions of my own.

1. "If you add to a thread that already has 18 pages of discussion, it probably won't get much attention. If you have a new question, make a new posting."

> Why is "posting" instead of "post"?

2. " There is no hardware fault, I think that there is some issue with the AC's cooling in the particular zone.

> Why isn't "issue" plural here? (issues)

3. I saw an ad looking for a clerk and said: Initially at 3 months.

> Is this sentence correct? Or "for" could replace "at" since it indicates "duration"

4. Start with a strict accounts-receivable policy that mandates that various things happen at different stages of the receivable. So, at 31 days past due, make a client services-type call (i.e., “Did you receive the invoice?”). At 61 days, call with a 10-day warning, threatening(nicely)to send the receivable to a third-party collection agency at the 90-day mark.

> Does "at 31 days" mean "on the 31st day"?

> Does "mark" mean "interval"?

5. She's grieving over the death of her son.

She's grieving for her dead son.

She's grieving about her dead son.

She's grieving at the death of her son.

> What's the difference here using different preposition?

6. Any differences between "in last decade" and "over the last decade"?

7. She's trembling from / for / with fear. What's the difference?

Thanks

TN
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Too many questions in one post!! Emotion: smile

1. "If you add to a thread that already has 18 pages of discussion, it probably won't get much attention. If you have a new question, make a new posting."

> Why is "posting" instead of "post"? It's a less used alternative. The meanings are the same.

2. " There is no hardware fault, I think that there is some issue with the AC's cooling in the particular zone.

> Why isn't "issue" plural here? (issues) You mean because of some? some can mean an unidentified, an unknown. In that case it goes with a singular noun. Note also that the verb is singular: is some issue.

Some guy was asking for you. (an unidentified / unknown guy)
She was talking about some kind of tree. (an unidentified / unknown kind of tree)
He said he had read it in some book. (an unidentified / unknown book)

3. I saw an ad looking for a clerk and said: Initially at 3 months.

> Is this sentence correct? Or "for" could replace "at" since it indicates "duration" "for" would be better, I think.

4. Start with a strict accounts-receivable policy that mandates that various things happen at different stages of the receivable. So, at 31 days past due, make a client services-type call (i.e., "Did you receive the invoice?"). At 61 days, call with a 10-day warning, threatening(nicely)to send the receivable to a third-party collection agency at the 90-day mark.

> Does "at 31 days" mean "on the 31st day"? Yes.
> Does "mark" mean "interval"? No. point.

5. She's grieving over the death of her son.
She's grieving for her dead son.
She's grieving about her dead son.
She's grieving at the death of her son.

> What's the difference here using different prepositions? about does not sound very idiomatic to my ear. The other examples are all fine. over, for, and at all imply because of.

6. Any differences between "in last decade" and "over the last decade"? Not really. over emphasizes the passage of time.

7. She's trembling from / for / with fear. What's the difference? with is the only one that strikes me as normal and ordinary, but you may hear the others as well. The meanings are all the same.

Others may have different opinions on these.

CJ
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Hi CJ,

I'm sorry there were too many questions there. I find it a bit hard to use prepositions with similiar meaning but depend on the context they could turn differently.

Thanks again.

TN