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Hi,

I have some questions on this. Please answer these.

Would you say what comes after the underlined phrases need not be concerned with the issue of putting articles before the nonns that come after them?

1. a kind of watermelon/pencil

2. a typeof watermelon/pencil

3. a form of watermelon/pencil

4. a sort of watermelon/pencil

Then, if I want to use the phrase 'a piece' or 'a part', the air of awkwardness seeps in, at least to me:

a slice of watermelon/pencil

a part of watermelon/pencil

and it has to be, to me, this: a slice/part of a/the watermelon or pencil

But if I want to use a noun tha is variable or uncountable (I think that is what it is called) the awkwardness more or less dissipates, at least to me:

a slice (or 'part' or 'a part') of apple/happiness

Why is that?
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<<

1. a kind of watermelon/pencil

2. a typeof watermelon/pencil

3. a form of watermelon/pencil

4. a sort of watermelon/pencil
With these four, you may occasionally hear a kind (type, form, sort) of a watermelon (pencil), but your version above is more or less standard.

>>

CJ
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Slices (and pieces) of food cut from a larger amount follow this pattern:

a [slice / piece] of [-- / the] [pie / cake / watermelon / meat] (always non-countable)

Use the in the formula above if the pie, cake, watermelon, or meat has already been mentioned in the conversation and you are specifically referring to the same pie, cake, watermelon, or meat as before. You may do this in a situation that you feel requires a contrast:

[Both a pie and a cake are visible on a table.]

-- Would you like a piece of cake?
-- No, thank you, but I'd like a piece of (the) pie.
(the is optional, but using it would certainly alert your host that you had noticed the pie!)

Otherwise, don't use any article.

CJ
a part of can be followed by the whole range of possible articles. (a(n), the, or no article.)

CJ