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Hi, Members and Gurus !

Dining one evening with his friends, young Dr. Aidid, a lonely Hindu widower with three children, was interrupted by a call to the hospital where he served under the arrogant Dr. Callendar. Aidid regretfully left his friends and arrived by cab at the hospital, only to find that Dr. Callendar had departed without leaving him a message. To add insult to injury, just as Aidid was about to leave, his cab was abruptly occupied by two English women who did not even bother to thank him.

Upset at this typical treatment at the hands of the English, Aidid dropped into a Hindu temple for a moment of peace. Seeing an English woman there, he shouted at her, assuming she had not removed her shoes. But the English woman, Mrs. Moore, was sensitive to Hindu custom, and had entered the temple barefooted. This pleased Dr. Aidid so much that he started a conversation with Mrs. Moore who had recently arrived in India and wanted to see as much of it as possible. Dr. Aidid was pleased to find that Mrs. Moore shared his low opinion of Dr. Callendar.

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Questions on the underlined parts...

1. Shouldn't it be "a call from the hospital"? Meaning " a call asking someone to come to the hospital" can be expressed into "a call to the hospital"?

2. barefooted... How about "barefeeted"? Or, "barefoot" like "I went there barefoot"?
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pructus1. Shouldn't it be "a call from the hospital"? Meaning " a call asking someone to come to the hospital" can be expressed into "a call to the hospital"?
It could just as well have been "from", but "to" also makes sense as you explained it.
pructus2. barefooted... How about "barefeeted"? Or, "barefoot" like "I went there barefoot"?
"barefeeted" -- No! Never! "barefoot" -- Yes. Also possible.

CJ
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Thanks, Calif....