I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something:

"You will have to confirm your coming."
Here, "coming" is a gerund.
"You will have to confirm you're coming."
Here, "you're coming" is a subordinate clause.
Both sentences sound the same and have the same meaning, but have different grammatical structure.
I can imagine that, whichever one I choose, it'll look wrong to some.

Of course, there are other possibilities, like sticking the old "that" in, but still..
Can anyone think of any other examples of this kind of curiosity?

Stewart.

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Stewart Gordon typed thus:
I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something: "You will have to confirm your coming." Here, "coming" is ... coming" is a subordinate clause. Both sentences sound the same and have the same meaning, but have different grammatical structure.

I disagree. In some dialects they sound different, but more importantly they do not mean the same think. They mean something very similar, but not exactly the same. This is why they both exist, perhaps.

David
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"You will have to confirm your coming." "You will have to confirm you're coming."

They mean something very similar, but not exactly the same.

Would you care to give us your two interpretations?

Thanks,
R.
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david56 typed thus:
Stewart Gordon typed thus:

I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something: ... and have the same meaning, but have different grammatical structure.

I disagree. In some dialects they sound different, but more importantly they do not mean the same think. They mean something very similar, but not exactly the same. This is why they both exist, perhaps.

Blast and damn. If I thing that, I've got another thing coming.

David
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I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something: "You will have to confirm your coming." Here, "coming" is ... like sticking the old "that" in, but still.. Can anyone think of any other examples of this kind of curiosity?

He clung to his Tory sentiments.
He clung to his story of a mugging.
He clung to history as a justification.
(Granted, stress on differing syllables can bring about some differentiation, and Hiss vs Hizz. In your examples, I usually distinguish you're from your by pronouncing the former somewhat like "ewer".

I can imagine were and we're being identical (wurr), but I hear some of my own frequent acquaintances pronouncing we're as "ware" (unless I have that reversed). And I more often pronounce "we're" as "weer" than as "wur".
I can imagine were and we're being identical (wurr), but I hear some of my own frequent acquaintances pronouncing we're as "ware" (unless I have that reversed). And I more often pronounce "we're" as "weer" than as "wur".

When followed by a word beginning with a vowel, many (most?) Brits (and many/most others?) pronounce the "we're" vowel as just a quick /I/, with the /r/ getting tacked onto the beginning of the next word e.g. "wirrunder attack" or "wirrout of stock".

Ross Howard
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Stewart Gordon typed thus:

I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something: ... and have the same meaning, but have different grammatical structure.

I disagree. In some dialects they sound different, but more importantly they do not mean the same think. They mean something very similar, but not exactly the same. This is why they both exist, perhaps.

Is that an example of a thingo?

john
I discovered this yesterday, as I was thinking about something: ... and have the same meaning, but have different grammatical structure.

OK, but the first (with "your") is not a sentence that anyone would actually use.
I can imagine were and we're being identical (wurr), but I hear some ofmy own frequent acquaintances pronouncing we're as "ware" (unless I have that reversed).

Yes, reversed. Some people pronounce "were" like "ware".

Adrian
OK, but the first (with "your") is not a sentence that anyone would actually use.

He's just used it Emotion: smile
R.
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