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Hello,

Today I read an online article about a basketball player named Hakeem Olajuwon and found this paragraph:

"Because I'm lucky enough to have your ear for however long, I don't care that this might come off as a bit twee. A little embarrassing. A little too forthright. I'm OK with that. Hopefully you are, as well."

Apparently the author treated 'A little embarrassing' and 'A little too forthright' as two complete sentences. That is grammatically okay, right?

Thanks,
VUSHCM
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It's a stylistic choice, probably intended to make the text feel more racy.
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vushcm Am I mistaken in saying that you believe the style is grammatically acceptable?
The style is grammatically acceptable. It needs to be used in the right context (e.g. one would not use it in dry, formal writing), but this context is OK. If overused it could become tiresome.
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If it's a transcription, you could argue that the transcriber should have used dashes.

When a person is speaking impromptu, he may not consider the sentence structure.
I'd say the emboldened phrases function as alternative complements to "come off as."
. . . . it might come off as X - Y - Z.
 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Mr WordyIt's a stylistic choice, probably intended to make the text feel more racy.
Hello Mr. Wordy,

Thank you for your reply. Am I mistaken in saying that you believe the style is grammatically acceptable? 'A little embarrassing' is a complete thought just like the word 'Yes', which can stand alone by itself as a sentence?

Best,
VUSHCM
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vushcmI don't care that this might come off as a bit twee. A little embarrassing. A little too forthright. I'm OK with that
These are not complete sentences. They are merely adjectival phrases of emotions.
Consider this: I don't like people who are self-centered, rude, and insincere.
 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
dimsumexpress
vushcmI don't care that this might come off as a bit twee. A little embarrassing. A little too forthright. I'm OK with that
These are not complete sentences. They are merely adjectival phrases of emotions. Consider this: I don't like people who are self-centered, rude, and insincere.
Hello,

I understand about 'adjectival' things you stated - words or phrases separated with commas. All I asked for was a 'Yes' or 'No' answer regarding the grammatical aspect of the phrases between the periods (.), which should only be used to start a new sentence. Thus, when you stated, "These are not complete sentences," did you believe they are grammatically wrong?

Best Regards,
VUSHCM
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Hi, dimsum.
I agree they're not sentences.
I just don't know whether we're critiquing the basketball player or the reporter.

At least in your list of adjectives you include a conjunction before the last one:
I don't like people who are self-centered, rude, and insincere.

A sentence would be,
"I don't care that this might come off as a bit twee, a little embarrassing, or a little too forthright."
(alternately) "I don'care that this might come off as a bit twee - a little embarrassing - a little too forthright."

But my suspicion is that this guy is ad libbing. He stops after "twee." He thinks a little bit, and then adds two more ways to express what he means, either parenthetically or in apposition.
That's why I feel the dash is most appropriate.

Regards, - A.
vushcmI understand about 'adjectival' things you stated - words or phrases separated with commas. All I asked for was a 'Yes' or 'No' answer regarding the grammatical aspect of the phrases between the periods (.), which should only be used to start a new sentence. Thus, when you stated, "These are not complete sentences," did you believe they are grammatically wrong?
I realize this is not addressed to me.
I think what the basketball player said is fine. It's casual conversation.
I think the way the reporter punctuated it is grammatically incorrect, and unacceptable.

I believe certain structures are acceptable as answers to a question, which would not be considered to be grammatically correct sentences.

Are you ready? (reply) Yes.
How would you describe Hakeem's statement? (reply) A little too forthright.
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