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'If yesterday was Wednesday, then tomorrow is Friday.'
Is this sentence grammatically correct? Is it possible to use 'is' instead of 'was'? And how would you explain the grammatical aspect of this sentence. For example, in the Zero Conditional, we use the present simple form for both the 'If clause and the Main clause?
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marcos054'If yesterday was Wednesday, then tomorrow is Friday.'
Is this sentence grammatically correct?
Welcome to English Forums! Yes, the sentence is grammatically correct.

I would leave it exactly as it is.

Don't get hung up on the "named" conditionals: Zero, First, Second, Third. You can make conditional sentences with all sorts of tense combinations. It's just that the most common ones have names, and the less used ones don't have names.

CJ
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Hi, marcos, Welcome to EF

I say it's correct.

If you knew that yesterday were in fact not Wednesday, then it would be a different condition: If yesterday were Wednesday, then tomorrow would be Friday.

Hopefully, others will elaborate on this. If I understand your meaning about zero conditional, "if yesterday" has to be a special case. "If yesterday is Wednesday" is absurd. I suppose it's tempting to argue that if we can say "Tommorrow is Friday" we should be able to say "Yesterday is Wednesday." Tradition??

- A.
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJim
marcos054'If yesterday was Wednesday, then tomorrow is Friday.'
Is this sentence grammatically correct?
Welcome to English Forums! Yes, the sentence is grammatically correct.

I would leave it exactly as it is.

Don't get hung up on the "named" conditionals: Zero, First, Second, Third. You can make conditional sentences with all sorts of tense combinations. It's just that the most common ones have names, and the less used ones don't have names.

CJ

Thank you so much for your reply. Knowing that you can make conditional sentences with all sorts of tense combinations makes things clearer for me. But I would also like to ask if the sentence can be classified as a mixed conditional, " If yesterday was Wednesday, then tomorrow is Friday", or just simply a "special case".
Is there a standard definition of "mixed conditional"? Or is it just any conditional other than the "named conditionals"?

It seems to me that different grammarians may define the term "mixed conditional" differently from others. What definition are you using?

CJ
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CalifJimIs there a standard definition of "mixed conditional"? Or is it just any conditional other than the "named conditionals"?

It seems to me that different grammarians may define the term "mixed conditional" differently from others. What definition are you using?

CJ


I've seen some sentences from another website showing mixed conditionals in the following patterns:

1. If + past perfect, ...would + infinitive
2. If + past perfect, ...would + be + present participle
3. If + past simple, ...would + have + past participle
4. If + past continuous, ... would + have + past participle
5. If + past continuous/past simple, ...would + infinitive

All of them I think are unreal conditional sentences. The website says, "Sometimes unreal conditional sentences are mixed..." It didn't mention about the possibility of mixed conditional for "general truths". If the term "mixed conditional" is defined as any conditional other than the named conditionals (zero, first, second, third), probably the one for "general truths" can be classified as mixed conditional. I'm not sure, though.
marcos054'If yesterday was Wednesday, then tomorrow is Friday.'
Hi marcos054

I would equate the sentence in your first post with a so-called "zero conditional". You can think of it this way:

'If it is true that yesterday was Wednesday, then it is true that tomorrow is Friday.
Is that "cheating"? Emotion: smile

If it is true that it rained, it is true that I would take an umbrella.
If it is true that it had rained, it is true that I would have taken an umbrella.

Aren't all conditionals 'zero conditionals' by this tactic?

CJ
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CalifJimAren't all conditionals 'zero conditionals' by this tactic?
I wouldn't say so. Let's test it:

Today is Sunday.
If yesterday had been Wednesday, then today would be Thursday.
If it were true that yesterday was Wednesday, then today would be Thursday.
If today is Sunday, then yesterday was Saturday.

I suppose it needs to be stated that today IS in fact Sunday. I was looking at the sentences in terms of equations that are always/generally true -- which is basically what a "zero conditional" is. If "today is Sunday" is factual, then it will also always be factual that "yesterday was Saturday".
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