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A: 'I saw a burger restaurant at the corner of the street.'

B: 'I saw a burger restaurant at the corner of a street.'

C: 'I saw a burger restaurant at a corner of the street.'

D: 'I saw a burger restaurant at a corner of a street.'

To me A and B sounds natural, but C seems to lack information, I think "a corner" needs further information. For example, "a corner" should be changed to "the corner" or "the farthest corner". Am I right?

As for D, I'm not sure whether "a corner of a street" is correctly used.
"A corner of a street", being doubly indefinite, sounds unnatural and quite vague to me.
The hearer can't call up an image of "a street", and in addition can't judge which corner it is. I think the hearer might get a bit confused. So I think "a corner of a street" should be avoided. Am I right?

Comments  
anonymousSo I think "a corner of a street" should be avoided. Am I right?

Yes. We don't put it that way. It is in fact avoided. It's "at end of the street/block" or "on the corner". The corner is not of the street, it is an entity unto itself. The restaurant can be at the corner of A Street and B Avenue, more specifically on the southwest corner of those two thoroughfares.

---Thank you anonymous.
I understand. So can I say "at a corner of the classroom" lacks information, and "at a corner of a classroom" is odd?