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Here are a couple [of] books on physics.

I've seen you a couple [of] times today.

Could you provide a couple [of] answers to each question?

In what contexts, 'of' is needed after 'a couple'? I'm confused.

Thanks in advance!
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You need the 'of' in all these cases.

Just thinking quickly now, I can't think of any cases where you wouldn't need the 'of'.
Using "couple" without "of" is common informal usage in the US. It would often be used in conversation, less commonly in writing.
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Thank you, guys. Spides, could you give some examples of the informal uses? I'm just curious.
New2grammarThank you, guys. Spides, could you give some examples of the informal uses? I'm just curious.
Just omit the word 'of', N2G. Emotion: wink
American usage:

Here are a couple books on physics.

I've seen you a couple times today.

Could you provide a couple answers to each question?
In the UK 'couple of' is often contracted to 'coupla' in speech. Is the 'of' really omitted in the US or is it implied in this way?
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I think that an "off" is required in AmE.
Hi Nona

Yes, it is quite common in AmE for the word 'of' to be omitted completely after 'a couple' (literally gone without so much as a hint of the word 'of').
However, when 'of' is not omitted, you will also hear people say 'a coupla'.

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Hi NJ

If someone were to use the expression 'a couple off', the meaning would not be the same as 'a couple' or 'a couple of'.
That's true in my neck of the woods too.

All of these sound perfectly natural:

Here are a couple of books on Byzantine Art
Here are a coupla books...
Here are a couple books...

I would be unable to tell you when I'd be more inclined to include the "of" in speech. I'd use the "of" in writing.
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