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1) S. wishes to express his Skeptical caution which prevents him from maintaining that things are by nature such that ataraxia can only be reached by following the suspensive path.

Well, "following the suspesive path" is kind of a metaphor. It means "adopting suspension of judgment.

2) Hence, if when presenting the Skeptical end S. explicitly points out that he suspends judgment about the good or bad character usually attributed to things, he could hardly believe that ataraxia is inherently good and tarachv inherently bad.

Is the emboldened expression correct?

Thanks,

Sextus
Comments  
Only my opinion--

1) I don't really like the phrase 'the suspensive path'. I think it'd be just fine as-- 'be reached by suspension of judgment'.
2) The phrase 'good or bad character' sounds okay to me. An option-- 'Hence, if S. explicitly points out, when presenting the Skeptical end, that he suspends judgment about the good or bad character usually attributed to things, he could hardly believe that ataraxia is inherently good and tarachv inherently bad.'
Ok, thanks Davkett.

Sextus
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<presenting the Skeptical end>

I wonder whether this might be taken in the wrong sense. (So to speak.)

MrP
MrPedantic<presenting the Skeptical end>

I wonder whether this might be taken in the wrong sense. (So to speak.)

Frankly, I don't know what the phrase means. I had assumed the larger context would tell.
Mm... Perhaps "expounding", "explaining"?

Sextus
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This may well contradict my previous posts on this subject; but I think I'd choose "...when expounding the Skeptic's goal..."

I'd also put a comma after "caution", as "which" here seems to be non-defining: "...caution, which prevents..."

MrP
Thanks, P. Yep, in my field there's a comma after "caution," but sometimes I make mistakes while copying.

Cheers,

Sextus