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Hi all
This is my first question at the forums so please don't judge too harsh ^^

In the net, I saw the both variants of the phrase used a couple of years ago and a couple years ago. I am confused. What is correct?

Waiting for your replies. Emotion: smile
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I don't recommend omitting of in a couple of ....

The first slip into "lower class English" is the omission of the "v" sound in "of": couple o' (cuppul uh). Emotion: smile

But by the time you leave out the whole word "of", you've sunk to the bottom. No nice people will talk to you, and you will probably be shunned for life. Emotion: big smile

Just teasing!

Or am I? Emotion: thinking

CJ
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Comments  
Hi,

" a couple of years ago " is the right phrase.
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lfcforeverWhat is correct?

Both phrases are possible. "of" is optional here.
Hi,
quoted from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary (http://www.learnersdictionary.com ):

a couple

informal 1 : two or a few of something

Note: In informal U.S. English, a couple can be used like a couple of before a plural noun. Ex: I lost interest in the book after a couple chapters.

So as MrPernikety said, both are ok, and "of" can be left out in informal American English (and maybe in British English too, but I'm not sure).

Emotion: smile
Doesn't 'a couple (of) require a plural noun to follow???
KooyeenHi,

quoted from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary (http://www.learnersdictionary.com ):

a couple

informal 1 : two or a few of something

Note: In informal U.S. English, a couple can be used like a couple of before a plural noun. Ex: I lost interest in the book after a couple chapters.



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Kooyeen
So as MrPernikety said, both are ok, and "of" can be left out in informal American English (and maybe in British English too, but I'm not sure).


Yeah, I remember Amy's advice. If my memory serves me right, she advised me to use "a couple" without "of" in informal conversation Emotion: smile

As far as British English is concerned, I guess Mr. Pedantic and Clive know best.
Hi

I would always use 'of' in the given example - 'a couple of years ago'
This is my take:

"A couple" can mean:

Two persons considered as joined together, as a married or engaged pair, lovers, or dance partners: They make a handsome couple.

Any two persons considered together.

"A couple of " is an idiomatic expression meaning more than two, but not many, a small number of; a few.

The new paint will take a couple of hours to dry. This suggests at least 2 no more than 3.

For all my American life, I've only learned to use the expression with "of". It souns wrong to me wthout it, although it's considered correct.









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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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