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Hi

What would be the word or phrase for when one group uses a certain demand (a deterrent demand used to prevent the other group from not acceping remaining demands) as only to force the other group to accept its remaining other demands. Please let me know. Thanks.
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It sounds to me like a threat.
But I'm having a hard time thinking of an example.

You're saying that one demand among a group of demands is an inducement to accept the others.
But how can demanding something be an inducement?

If you don't accept the others, we will X. "X" is a threat; it's not a demand.

Demand #1 - We demand that you concede to demands #2, #3, and #4.

The categories seem to be jumbled here.

Can you give a more specific example?

Rgdz, - A.
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AvangiIt sounds to me like a threat.But I'm having a hard time thinking of an example.You're saying that one demand among a group of demands is an inducement to accept the others.But how can demanding something be an inducement?If you don't accept the others, we will X. "X" is a threat; it's not a demand.Demand #1 - We demand that you concede to demands #2, #3, and #4.The categories seem to be jumbled here.Can you give a more specific example?Rgdz, - A.
Thanks, Avangi. Hope you are fine.

Yes, it could be a threat. Couldn't it be called 'deterrent' demand?

Let me think of some example. Let's say, workers are on strike. They want the management to accept their demands or their demand of compensation be accepted and given certificate of experience so that they could look for work elsewhere. The workers don't really want the demand of compensation and certificate to be accepted...

Best wishes
Jackson
Jackson6612They want the management to accept their demands or their demand of compensation be accepted and given certificate of experience so that they could look for work elsewhere.
Have you actually come across the expression "deterrent demand" in a negotiations context?

My feeling is that as a collocation this would be quite special, and would need to have gained some acceptance in the field of union/contract negotiations before it could be used freely.

I don't think you should put the words together simply because they seem to express what you want to convey. (You would be "coining a phrase," so to speak.)


The first set of demands in this example does not include a "compensation" package?


The devil seems to be in the details here. How is management to know that if they accede to the first group of demands, the one about the "certificate of experience" will not be pressed?

Is it specified in the list of demands that these are alternatives? - one set or the other??

We demand that you do either A; or B, C, and D.


It has no teeth. Why can't management just say, "Buzz off! You're not getting any of this stuff!" ?


Edit. Okay, your expression "deterrent demand" has an accepted use in the field of economics, as in "the law of supply and demand."


Nothing in "negotiating demands."


I think I'd call it a "dummy demand."