+0

Every time I think I have a solid grasp of the whomever/whoever rules, I come across some online examples that conflict with what I've learnt. For instance:

https://www.businesswritingblog.com/business_writing/2013/04/tricky-pronouns-whoever-and-whomever.html

In this article, the following sentence is included as question #7 in the test at the end:

"Whoever/Whomever the CEO recommends will undoubtedly be considered for the position."

According to the author, the correct word is "Whomever", but this contradicts what I've learnt elsewhere. The way I see it, the verb "will" needs a subject pronoun, and so the word needed is "Whoever". The reasoning the author has given in the comments section below the article is that the pronoun is the object of the verb "recommends", but I thought "the CEO recommends" is supplementary and doesn't affect the sentence.

Likewise, in this example of my own, I would also use whoever:

"Please give the jewellery box to whoever you think is the most trustworthy."


https://www.toppr.com/guides/english-grammar/confusing-words/whoever-vs-whomever/

This page features "Give it to whomever." as an incorrect example, which I don't think is right because, using the he/him substitution rule, it would be "Give it to him." At the bottom of the article, the list of correct examples includes "Jenna should give the medal to whomever she thinks deserves it." Similar to the above, I'm not sure this is right because I think that "whomever" is the subject pronoun of "deserves" and, therefore, should be whoever.


Please may someone verify whether the examples from the sources are correct or incorrect?

+0
JJDouglasWhoever/Whomever the CEO recommends will undoubtedly be considered for the position."According to the author, the correct word is "Whomever", but this contradicts what I've learnt elsewhere.

The blog is wrong.

JJDouglasThis page features "Give it to whomever." as an incorrect example,

This blog is also wrong.



+0

The first thing you must do is strike this link off your list of resources:

https://www.toppr.com/guides/english-grammar/confusing-words/whoever-vs-whomever/

It is riddled with errors.


As for the other link you mentioned, I only looked at the test at the end, and all the answers there were correct.

JJDouglasAccording to the author, the correct word is "Whomever", but this contradicts what I've learnt elsewhere. The way I see it, the verb "will" needs a subject pronoun, and so the word needed is "Whoever".

No. We don't reason it that way. "will" needs a subject, but it does not need a subject pronoun. A subject is a noun phrase. In the case of whoever/whomever, we choose according to how these words function within the entire noun phrase that forms the subject. All the reasoning is focused internally on this noun phrase, not on the function of that phrase in the larger sentence. (The same rule applies to who/whom as well.)

Whoever/Whomever the CEO recommends will undoubtedly be considered for the position.

Ignoring the portion that is struck out, we have (with re-ordering)

The CEO recommends ___ whoever / whomever ___.


Please give the jewellery box to [whoever (you think) is the most trustworthy].

Here we ignore two different groups of words. As before, we ignore the portion of the sentence that is not part of the whoever/whomever noun phrase. But here we also ignore a little parenthetical group that does not enter into the mix that determines our choice between whoever and whomever. It's essentially You think (that) ______ is the most trustworthy.

JJDouglasGive it to ______.

Here we don't have a verb for either whoever or whomever to interact with, so either can be correct. It depends on what the speaker has in mind but is not saying.

Give it to whoever (wants it). / Give it to whomever (you want to give it to).

If you are the speaker, and you're like me and not sure what you really mean, then say

Give it to anyone.

JJDouglasJenna should give the medal to [_______ she thinks deserves it].

This example is almost identical to one that I've already explained above, so I'm sure you can work it out.

CJ


JJDouglasPlease may someone verify ...
Can someone please verify ...

CJ

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  

Thank you, CJ. I think I understand far better now.

Regarding your correction of my last sentence, why is it incorrect to say may in this instance? I tend to use may as my default instead of can as I was led to believe it is more polite and formal.

Is it because may should only be used when you're asking permission to be able to do something yourself or granting permission to others?

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CalifJimIn the case of whoever/whomever, we choose according to how these words function within the entire noun phrase that forms the subject.

Great analysis, but what neither of these blogs mentions is that "whom" and its varieties are fading out of use, especially in casual contexts. "Whom" is now used primarily directly after prepositions, and not in other positions which indicate the objective case. It's a matter of language evolution

Who did you call?
Whoever you called is of no concern to me.
JJDouglaswhy is it incorrect to say may in this instance?

May is asking permission. e.g. May I sit on your antique Louis XIV chair?
Can is asking about the possibility or ability.

JJDouglasIs it because may should only be used when you're asking permission to be able to do something yourself or granting permission to others?

Yes.

May I ...? May we ...? (Do I (we) have permission to ...?)

You may .... (You have permission to ....)

In its permission meaning, there is no "May you please help me?" or anything of the kind. That's "Do you have permission to help me?", which is absurd in all but the strangest of situations.

CJ

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AlpheccaStarswhat neither of these blogs mentions is that "whom" and its varieties are fading out of use

I was saving that bomb for later. Emotion: smile

CJ