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Please tell me whether "a few minute drive is a compound noun in the following sentence? Please explain. Thanks

1.The temple is only a few minutes drive from the station.

2.The temple is only a few minute drive from the station.
Comments  
... only a drive of a few minutes ...
and
... only a few minutes' drive ...

are the correct possibilities.

No -- it's not a compound noun. It's a possessive structure.

CJ
2.The temple is only a few-minute drive from the station. I think it is possible. " a few " is an unknown number. " minute " is the noun and no need to be plural in this case.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
For some strange reason, we don't typically use anything but numbers in that kind of hyphenated pattern. two-minute drive, five-minute drive, etc.
But I've never seen other words like few in that position, and I've never heard anyone say it that way.

CJ
In the US, we say " the church is only few minutes from my house"

"Our house is only a 5 -mintue drive from here"

"My office is a three-mile from here"
GoodmanIn the US, we say "the church is only few minutes from my house"
You intended to write "the church is only a few minutes from my house", I suppose. Right?

paco
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The church is only a few minutes from my house.

The above sentence is ambiguous. It would be better to specify a few minutes' walk or a few minutes' drive.
Between the two choices, the answer should be number 1: The temple is only a few minutes drive away from the station.

However, there is debate as to whether or not there should be an apostrophe after minutes. Some believe that minutes should instead be minutes'.

You can view the discussion on this topic here: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=120182