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As Tom Moody basks in the acclaim and ponders what minor tweaks are required to make Sri Lanka genuine contenders to Australia's crown at the next World Cup, Greg Chappell will return to Bangalore and wonder just what he has let himself in for. Sri Lanka's 23rd victory in their last 29 games merely confirmed that India's position in one-day cricket's basement - 7th in the ICC table - was thoroughly deserved, and Chappell now faces an arduous task to resuscitate a team that has forgotten what it's like to play even half-decent cricket, leave alone be contenders.

If today's over-by-over comparison graph - the worm to use TV parlance - was to be given a title, Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold would probably be apt.

http://content.cricinfo.com/ioc/content/story/215548.html
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In the first sentence of the above, you will read the words 'Chappel has left what he has let himself in for'.
Is this grammatical?

In the second sentence, you will read the words 'leave alone be contenders'.
Is it grammatical?

In the third sentence, you will read the words 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold would probably be apt'. Is it grammatical?
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Hi Rotter,

In the first sentence of the above, you will read the words 'Chappel has left what he has let himself in for'. Is this grammatical?

Yes, it's fine. However, the more usual expresssion is 'let alone', not'leave alone'

Look again, the actual words are Greg Chappell will return to Bangalore and wonder just what he has let himself in for.

Yes. it's grammatical.

In the second sentence, you will read the words 'leave alone be contenders'. Is it grammatical?

Yes. But the more common expression is 'let alone ...'

In the third sentence, you will read the words 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold would probably be apt'. Is it grammatical?


Yes again. It means 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold' would be a good name for the graph.

You didn't ask what these things mean, just about the grammar, so I haven't discussed meaning.

Best wishes, Clive


Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks Clive for the answer.

You wrote the following:
In the third sentence, you will read the words 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold would probably be apt'. Is it grammatical?
Yes again. It means 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold' would be a good name for the graph.

You didn't ask what these things mean, just about the grammar, so I haven't discussed meaning.

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Yes, I would like to know the meaning. I don't know the meaning of 'Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold'.
Hi again,

If today's over-by-over comparison graph - the worm to use TV parlance - was to be given a title, Chronicle of a Defeat Foretold would probably be apt.


Here's what it means.

The Indian team's performance is very bad. This is shown by a graph, which looks at each over.

This graph, I think, was shown on TV across the bottom of the screen. Information that crawls across the bottom of the screen in this way is called 'a worm' by TV people.

Here is some vocabulary: chronicle = a story / foretold = predicted / apt = suitable.

The writer says that the graph shows that India will lose in the future, so if you gave this graph a title, a suitable one would be 'Story of a Predicted Defeat'. The meaning is that the graph shows India will be defeated again in the future.

As a general comment, sports writers often like to write their stories in an elaborate and fancy style.

Best wishes again, Clive