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Hello! Could you help me, please? I have read the articles about the word "fruit" but still haven't found the exact answer. Is the word "fruit" countable or uncountable? (the food in general, I mean, not the type of fruit, not the result of labour). Some people say it is uncountable, some say it is collective. Is it the same as the word "advice" or "family" after all? Thank you!

For example, which is correct:

I eat a fruit / I eat some fruit.

I have a little fruit / I have a few fruit.
I eat much fruit / I eat many fruit.

There are fruit in my fridge / There is fruit in my fridge.

Fruit is tasty / Fruit are tasty.
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Comments  
"Fruit" is almost always uncountable in its literal meaning. Only rarely is "fruits" called for. One example is "The pineapple plant will bear multiple fruits after its first fruiting if it is not pruned." You also see it in the expression "fruits and vegetables".

Although when you have three oranges in your refrigerator you do indeed have three fruits in there, nobody ever says that. You have some fruit in your fridge, you have a few pieces of fruit in it, or you have a few oranges in it.

Taking your examples:

I eat a fruit / I eat some fruit.

Let's change the tense to make it more natural:
"I ate a fruit." That is possible but strange. I can't believe you don't know what it was.
"I ate some fruit." That is normal.
"I ate some fruits." That, too, is possible, but very strange. That is a good example of what not to do. We would name them if they were all the same or call them pieces of fruit if they were not.

I have a little fruit. / I have a few fruit.

"I have a little fruit." Good.
"I have a few fruit." No. It would have to be "fruits", but again, that would rarely be called for.

I eat much fruit / I eat many fruit.

"I eat much fruit." That is unnatural because of "much", but "fruit" is right.
"I eat many fruit." No. Again, the plural is needed. This one is more likely than some of the others because it can mean that you habitually eat many kinds of fruit.

There are fruit in my fridge / There is fruit in my fridge.

"There are fruit in my fridge." No. There are a few pieces of fruit in it.

"There is fruit in my fridge." Yes.

Fruit is tasty / Fruit are tasty.

"Fruit is tasty." Yes.
"Fruit are tasty." No.
Would There's some fruit in my fridge be correct?
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HUBLOTWould There's some fruit in my fridge be correct?
Yes.
Thanks a lot, enoon. Emotion: smile



Is There's fruit in... more common than There's some fruit in...?
I'd call it a tossup.

It really depends on your habits.

If your family eats a lot of fruit, and it is common for there to be some in the fridge,
it might be more natural for you to skip the "some."

I'm reminded of the line from the song,
But there's booze in the blender. Emotion: drinksEmotion: drunk
This is the normal condition. (no "some")

When it's not the usual situation, "some" is more natural:
I think there might be some fruit in the fridge.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks a lot, Avangi.
Thousand times I like your answer! Thank you very much!!! May all the good things happen to you! Emotion: left hug
Great and clear answer. Thanks an ocean🙏🙏
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