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Hi, I have a question about the usage of "a."

Could you please tell me which of the following sentences is correct?

1) I want to be a good doctor and father.

or,

2) I want to be a good doctor and a good father.
Comments  
Both are correct. No. 2 emphasizes your two roles as a doctor and a father.
CB
Wow, what a quick response you made!

Thank you so much.
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If I remember correctly, learners are advised to use only one article even though there's multiple roles. Otherwise, it'll give the impression that there are multiple persons when there's actually one person.

For example

Susan, a mother of 3 and loving grandmother died in a car accident in Ohio last week.

What do you think?

Thanks in advance!
Hi,

If I remember correctly, learners are advised to use only one article even though there's multiple roles. Otherwise, it'll give the impression that there are multiple persons when there's actually one person.

For example

Susan, a mother of 3 and loving grandmother, died in a car accident in Ohio last week.

What do you think? The wording of your example makes it likely that it's just one person. eg In such a context, after calling Susan by name, my initial descrition of a third person would not be to comment that she was 'a loving grandmother'. Instead, I'd use her name.

And the comma, which is necessary, makes the meaning clear. eg

Susan, a doctor and a lawyer, died in this car accident. = one person.

Susan, a doctor and a lawyer died in this car accident. = three people.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive,

Let's say I forgot to include the second comma. So you would interpret the following example as three victims.

Susan, a doctor and a lawyer died in this car accident. = three people.

If I had left out the second 'a', would you have interpret it as one victim? If yes, obmission of the sequent commas makes the sentence error proof. Can I say that?

Thanks!
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Hi,

Let's say I forgot to include the second comma. So you would interpret the following example as three victims.

Susan, a doctor and a lawyer died in this car accident. = three people. Yes.

If I had left out the second 'a', would you have interpret it as one victim? I'd think, 'Uh-oh! This is bad grammar. Now I have to start trying to guess the intended meaning'.

If yes, obmission of the sequent commas makes the sentence error proof. Can I say that? No.

Best wishes, Clive
Actually, I made a mistake in the last question. Anyway, you answer is clear. Thanks!