+0
Mr Casanova's singingEZCODE BOLD END>EZCODE UNDERLINE END> was ----EZCODE BOLD END>EZCODE UNDERLINE END> elegant ---- to overshadowEZCODE BOLD END>EZCODE UNDERLINE END>, somewhat, the nominally top-billed star of the evening, Aprile Millo.

A) more / than
B) as / as
C) so / as
D) so / that
E) not / too
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Comments  
Hi,

I think B is the only logical answer based on the context.
what makes C wrong?
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Hi guys,

I vote for C.

Clive
"So /as" didn't sound right. The rule of thumb is that when we use "so", "that" is typically used in conjunction.

Ex: He was so tired from the weekend hiking that he could hardly stand up.

The arguement between John and Mary was so loud that everyone was awakened.

I read it a few times. At first I thought C may work, but not.
Hi Clive,

Can you please explain why. Perhaps, I could learn a thing or two Emotion: big smile.

Thanks,

Goodman
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Hi,

Goodman said correctly that The rule of thumb is that when we use "so", "that" is typically used in conjunction. eg The argument between John and Mary was so loud that everyone was awakened.

That's true, but an alternative structure is eg The argument between John and Mary was so loud as to awaken everyone. As you can see, the first 'half' is the same but not the second 'half'.

The meaning can be a touch different, since in the second version the awakening may or may not have actually happened, but let's not concern ourselves with that, right now.

Michael Swan discusses this structure in his Practical English Usage, Section 324. He notes that it's much less common, which I would certainly agree with. It sounds to me quite old-fashioned, stylish and charming. Swan notes that we still occasionally hear it in certain phrases, like Would you be so kind as to tell me the time? where it is a polite way to ask someone to do something.

But Goodman is right in terms of 'modern' English. So, I don't think a structure like this is a great thing to put in a test for English learners. If you all start talking like this all the time, it's going to sound very weird!

Best wishes, Clive
I'll choose both of B and C. "As … as …" can be replaced with "so … as …", although the latter sounds a bit archaic.

paco
On this particular sentence, I'm sure you will only hear C from native speakers.
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