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I've come across a lot of times the phrase: a great deal of and I still don't know whether it is used either with countable nouns or uncountable nouns or even both countable and uncountable.

And what about a large number of, a good deal of...?

In conclusion, would it be possible to use: a great deal of people, things...?

Thank you in advance.
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MaroldI've come across a lot of times the phrase: a great deal of and I still don't know whether it is used either with countable nouns or uncountable nouns or even both countable and uncountable.
Uncountable

And what about a large number of
Countable.


In conclusion, would it be possible to use: a great deal of people, things...?
No.
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To tell you the truth, people get these mixed up all the time and their usage is sometimes blurred. But, as a general rule, "A great deal of" and "a good deal of" are used with uncountable nouns.
A great deal of money was stolen from the bank.
A good deal of information became available after the police raid.
and
"A large number of" is used with countable nouns (a hint is the word ''number'). If there is a number, you can count it.
A large number of people entered the square early in the morning.
A large number of refugees escaped from the battered city.
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Thank you both.

The usage is now clear to me and I have to confess that I've been doing this mistake all the time.

I think I had a grasp of the issue now. Emotion: wink
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
But do we put the verb in - A large number of people - in singular or plural?
Plural

in the official Cambridge guide to IELTS page 39 we have a section as follow, when a great deal of changes were taking place. why is that???

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
anonymous

in the official Cambridge guide to IELTS page 39 we have a section as follow, when a great deal of changes were taking place. why is that???

Did you read the answers in this thread?

To tell you the truth, people get these mixed up all the time and their usage is sometimes blurred.

"Change" can be non-count. The editors did not catch the mistake. These are the correct options:

  • when a great number of changes were taking place.
  • when a great deal of change was taking place.