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It is clear from the passage that, among writers of nonfiction, there is a great variety of aim one of which is the desire to please.

Taken from a nationwide exam in Turkey.

Do you think there is anything wrong with this sentence? I do. A comma is needed after the word "aim" and I have doubts about the use of "one of which" to refer to a singular countable noun "aim". What do you think? Can the expression "a great variety of" be used with singular countable nouns?

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Comments  
DiamondrgTaken from a nationwide exam in Turkey.

Do you think there is anything wrong with this sentence? I do. A comma is needed after the word "aim" and I have doubts about the use of "one of which" to refer to a singular countable noun "aim". What do you think? Can the expression "a great variety of" be used with singular countable nouns?

here

here

It is clear from the passage that, among writers of nonfiction, there is a great variety of aim one of which is the desire to please. The green part of the sentence is kind of awkward to me.

I personally would use a different word to replace "aim" and perhap "variety", depending on the context of the preceding paragraph. e.g. interest, goal, and intents etc...

When we use "one of the", don't forget the plural form and in this case is "aims"

"A great varity" is considered a singular non-countable noun.
Goodman

"A great varity" is considered a singular non-countable noun.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
DiamondrgIt is clear from the passage that, among writers of nonfiction, there is a great variety of aim one of which is the desire to please.

Taken from a nationwide exam in Turkey.

Do you think there is anything wrong with this sentence? I do. A comma is needed after the word "aim" and I have doubts about the use of "one of which" to refer to a singular countable noun "aim". What do you think? Can the expression "a great variety of" be used with singular countable nouns?

here

here

For me, "It is clear from the passage that, among writers of nonfiction, there is wide variation in aim - one example being the desire to please."
Hi,

Should it be "wide variation in aims" since the noun "aim" is a countable noun?