+0
Scientists discovered a groundbreaking technology that may change the future of space travel.

Does "groundbreaking" in the above refer to "original" or "creative?" If neither, what does it mean? Thanks.
Comments  
The new technology is original and innovative.
The term "groundbreaking" is probably an agricultural term-referring to soil that has never before been cultivated. So a groundbreading technology is one that goes into uncharted territory never before charted or "plowed." Sometimes the term is used for something less than that, and eventually becomes deflated in its power. A good example of an adjective to which that has already happened is "terrific," which originally was applied to something that would inspire actual terror. Of course, it no longer has that power-and a "terrific" lunch is something good!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I would have said that the word groundbreaking came from the idea of "breaking ground" to begin the construction of a new building such as a school or church or civic building, in particular to lay the foundation, along with the attendant "groundbreaking ceremonies". So I would have thought the adjective groundbreaking was related to the creation of a foundation on which a much greater structure would be built.

Nevertheless, I think your interpretation is actually more convincing!

CJ
A Cornish PastyThe new technology is original and innovative.
Thanks, Pasty.

But what are the differences between creative and innovative?
CalifJimI would have said that the word groundbreaking came from the idea of "breaking ground" to begin the construction of a new building such as a school or church or civic building, in particular to lay the foundation, along with the attendant "groundbreaking ceremonies". So I would have thought the adjective groundbreaking was related to the creation of a foundation on which a much greater structure would be built.

Nevertheless, I think your interpretation is actually more convincing!

CJ

Thanks, Spides and Jim.

To make sure, is the bolded part equal to "along with the accompanying groundbreaking ceremonies?"
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes.
attendant = accompanying
Exactly.
[Y]

CJ
CalifJimYes.
attendant = accompanying
Exactly.
[Y]

CJ

Thanks, Jim.