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Hi, guys. I'd like to hear your opinion on how it sounds.

When will your leave will be?

I'm sure "a leave" meaining "vacation" is not a best choice here (still in doubt, though), but it refused to get out of my head before being clarified, so I would like to hear whether it sounds awkward or just a smidge. Emotion: stick out tongue Thanks a lot.
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RayHWhen will your leave will be?

I'm sure "a leave" meaining "vacation" is not a best choice here (still in doubt, though),
It's grammatically correct but kind of awkward sounding.
Hi RayH

In my opinion the sentence is ungrammatical. Are you sure you mean what you said? Do you also consider these correct?

When will it will be?
When will he will come?
When will it will happen?

Having two will's, in other words two defective auxiliaries, in one clause is very bad grammar.

CB
Comments  
FandorinWhen will your leave will be?

I'm sure "a leave" meaining "vacation" is not a best choice here (still in doubt, though),
It's grammatically correct but kind of awkward sounding. Try these:
When will your leave start?
When will your leave begin?

When do start your leave?
When does your leave begin?
etc., etc.

"leave" is fine if that is the usual way to talk about time off in your company/school/organization.
Note that you can substitute "vacation" for "leave" as desired.
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 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
Cool BreezeIn my opinion the sentence is ungrammatical. Are you sure you mean what you said? Do you also consider these correct?
Good point. I mis-read the original post as "When will your leave be?" Emotion: embarrassed
Thank you, guys. It was my fault. I meant "When will your leave be?" Second "will" will never appear. Emotion: stick out tongue Sort of late, it was, I was on the verge of hitting the sack, so .. Emotion: embarrassed Anyway you clarified it.
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