Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm
A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice.

And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever.

Will.
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice. And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever.

munter - ugly. An alternate to minger
"Alternate to"? From the BBC, for crying out loud!

Ross Howard
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice. And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever.

'Fit' as in a healthy shape or as in sexually attractive, perhaps anorexic with saline breast enhancement? Because I think there has been some evolution of meaning here.

"He's asking if you killed Freddie Miles and then killed Dickie Greenleaf."
"No, I did not kill Freddie Miles and then kill Dickie Greenleaf." -, "The Talented Mr Ripley"
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice. And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever.

I like this one:
book - cool. The first option given in predictive text when trying to type c-o-o-l.
...because it points to a whole new method of generating slang. The 21st century's answer to rhyming slang, perhaps.

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice. And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever. Will.

Oh no...I'm losing it! I don't know many of these words... Emotion: sad(

Could it be that I'm...stuck in 2003??
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a pronunciation guide would have been nice. And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever. Will.

PHEW that was a close call! I just realised that this is a BRIT website, and we all know that Brit language is WHACK! I'm still as down wit da tru ghettisims as eva, boos!
P.S., I DON'T wanna roll wit Vicky (they stole our American one!) because she's beastial!
We have no CREOLE peeps fo' influence here.
Mo' P.S.-itude: there ain't no such thing as "back slang"! It's called Snoop Dogg Language or "izzle"! You Brits can't steal Snoop's *** and then give it some made-up name.
For "crump", do they mean "crunk"???
"Feds" HUH?? Who doesn't know that? It ain't TEEN slang!

"Off the hook"??? Another Americanism that's common as can be for EVERYNE. Surprised they ain't adding in the much more UP-TO-DATE "off the CHAIN".
"Owned" is also common in America.
"Random", "rents", and "roll with" are all common and are NOTHING new. "Random" IS used when something's genuinely random. The AUE is random BECAUSE it is bizarre and unusual; not something you see every day a bunch of random old people thrown together on the net discussing the English language and dissing the likes of CJ and Bun Mui! Can't get much more random than that, can it?
"Sick" is common like "bad", "nasty" (sometimes), "crunk", "insane", etc. All "negative" words made positive.
Why include "sik"; it's just a spelling error? Are they gonna include "ca'nt" and "mean't" next?
"Switch" doesn't mean "turn on"! It means change! To "switch something up" means to do the unexpected, make a bizarre change.

"Vexed"??? An "old word" that "gained new currency" give me a break!

"Wicked" is NOTHING new, but I think it's primarily Mass.

"Yard"??? WTF?? Do they mean "crib"?
"Your mom" (and it's "yo' mom" or "yo' momma", WTF "mum"?? If you're dissing someone's plants maybe), another WTF? Old as can be! DAMN, British teens are out of it!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Article here detailing some teen-generated neologisms. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4074004.stm A think a ... And "Buff", meaning fit, has been around since like forever.

I like this one: book - cool. The first option given in predictive text when trying to type c-o-o-l. ...because it points to a whole new method of generating slang. The 21st century's answer to rhyming slang, perhaps.

Rhyming slang is gay. What's "predictive text"? If it's where they try to fill in the missing letters for you, I don't see how any part of "cool" would become "book".