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What is correct and why?

"There is a little difference." - In the meaning of a small difference?

"There is little difference." - Little without an article is solely used with uncountable words in the meaning of not much, so it is incorrect?
"Things are getting a little confused." - In the meaning of slightly, not much

"Things are getting a little bit confused." - In the meaning of slightly, not much

"Things are getting little confused." - It is incorrect, isn't it?

Are these sentences correct?

Thank you very much in advance.
Comments  
"There is little difference." - Little without an article is solely used with uncountable words in the meaning of not much, so it is incorrect? This is correct. It means there is not much difference. eg. There is little difference between scarlet and crimson.

"Things are getting little confused." - It is incorrect, isn't it? Yes, incorrect.

There is little confusion in Germany, as compared to Greece regarding the necessity of an austerity program in Greece.
I understand why "There is little confusion in Germany..." is correct as confusion is uncountable.

But how come little difference is correct when a difference is countable? Why in my dictionary is written: a little house, a little old lady, a little group (little functions here as an adjective).

I am a little puzzled about this.
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Difference can be uncountable - the state or quality of being unlike.
Most of the time it is used in the countable sense: a specific instance of being unlike.
"There is little difference." => So in this case, it is uncountable, right? Then I would understand it entirely.

"I have little time." - I have very little time. This is also a model use of little. As time is uncountable here, you can use little.

"I have a little time." - There is some/not much time.

"There is a little difference." => It doesn't make sense or is grammatically incorrect?
"I am a little bit tired."
"I am a little tired."

Thank you very much indeed for your correcting.
"There is a little difference." => It doesn't make sense or is grammatically incorrect? It is correct. There is some (not much) difference.

There is a little difference between crimson and scarlet. Trained artists with a keen sense of color can tell them apart.

Others feel that there is little difference, since they appear so much the same.
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Well, now I am clear about everything except these two sentences.

"There is little difference between scarlet and crimson. "
"There is a little difference between scarlet and crimson."

So according to you and your posts, the only difference is in the attitude towards the use of speakers what way they feel it to write.

If I am mistaken, I would be grateful for the last comment on explaining the difference between these two sentences.Emotion: smile
"There is little difference between scarlet and crimson. " This sentence focuses on the similarity of the two colors.
These shades of red look very much alike. They are different, but many people might confuse them.

"There is a little difference between scarlet and crimson." This sentence focuses on the (slight )difference between the two colors. Artists can tell them apart.
Thank you very much for your apt explanation!

And I am sorry for being so uncomprehending. You did very well.Emotion: smile
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