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Our experiment is an attempt to grow an entire forest at 560 parts per million. In other words, we're replicating the growth of forest 50 years from now around the world, when all forests will be bathed in that atmosphere

this part is about global warming issue. what I did not understand is in the part " we're replicating the growth of forest 50 years from now around the world, when all forests will be bathed in that atmosphere?"

I would like to thank too much.

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They make the assumption that in 50 years, some particular polutant will have increased in the atmosphere worldwide to a concentration of 560 ppm. At that time, all the forests in the world will have to "carry on their lives" under those "extreme" conditions.

So, we want to know how they will fare. What kinds of problems will they face??

So, we're setting up a laboratory experiment in which we replicate (copy - duplicate) those conditions. We can then see what happens. What kinds of problems do the trees have when they try to grow in an atmosphere of 560 ppm??
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Thank you too much

this one needs to be explained too:

KEVIN E. TRENBERTH, Nat'l Center for Atmospheric Research: Off the coast of during El Nino events, the sea level rises. And in the last El Nino event, it was about eight inches above the normal value. And what we saw was a lot of coastal erosion, houses toppling into the sea. And so that's sort of an indication as to what increases in sea level can do.

We can adapt to a climate change, as long as it occurs slowly enough. But if it occurs too rapidly, then it disrupts the assumptions that we've built into the way in which society works, whether we are planning agriculture, whether we're planning a building with its heating requirements, whether we're planning a dam.

Part I need is "[But if it occurs too rapidly, then it disrupts the assumptions that we've built into the way in which society works, whether we are planning agriculture, whether we're planning a building with its heating requirements, whether we're planning a dam]
it means " if climate change occurs too fast, it does not matter whatever we do for caution...

my best.
It's a little confusing because he's using a short-term time frame to explain a long-term time frame.

As he says, "the last El Nino Event." (I know that's not a sentence.) I guess only Noah was ready for the great flood.

He's judging our ability to cope with climate change in terms of our existing capabilities. He doesn't seem willing to take into account the incredible acceleration in the advance of technology. There will always be unexpected catastrophies (like Katrina) that catch us unprepared.

He's certainly correct that society's assumptions are often foolish - for example, planning our finances on the assumption that a particular boom will last forever.

I know you didn't ask for a sermon.

He's saying that if changes occur more rapidly than they have in the past, we'll be unable to deal with them.

I'm just taking issue with that, on grounds that man's ability to adapt enables him to reply to an accelerating crisis with an accelerating response.
Thank you for your very explanatory answer.
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