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I find that the following message is not grammatically perfect. Do you agree?

"This passport contains a chip and antenna embedded in the data page. In addition to the normal care and respect accorded to a passport, BioPass holders are advised to treat the BioPass with due care like any portable electronic device i.e. by ensuring that it does not become wet, bent or mutilated."

My issues are with those phrases that I have underlined:

1. As "chip and antenna" is not a common expression like "bread and butter", "fish and chips" and "bacon and eggs", it should have been "a chip and an antenna". (What do think?)

2. I find "to accord respect" to a passport rather uncanny.

3. The "due care like any portable electronic device" phrase does not sound right but I cannot say why.

4. Personally, I should have written ",i.e.,".

5. The "bent or mutilated" phrase too does not, to my mind, sound grammatical but I cannot say why.

Am I right? I should appreciate your views.
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Selvakumar1. As "chip and antenna" is not a common expression like "bread and butter", "fish and chips" and "bacon and eggs", it should have been "a chip and an antenna". (What do think?)
You're right, but I can live with it. It's more an infelicity than a blunder.
Selvakumar2. I find "to accord respect" to a passport rather uncanny.
Right again, but it's not too bad—a tad jocular, perhaps. It's the kind of thing you get from a harried journalist.
Selvakumar3. The "due care like any portable electronic device" phrase does not sound right but I cannot say why.
"Like" is used loosely, and he meant "any other electronic device". Again, sloppy but not criminal.
Selvakumar4. Personally, I should have written ",i.e.,".
sigh The correct punctuation is "device, i.e., by ensuring ...."
Selvakumar5. The "bent or mutilated" phrase too does not, to my mind, sound grammatical but I cannot say why.
There is a cliche caveat, "Do not bend, spindle or mutilate." The writer was invoking that clumsily.
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