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1. We say "play the piano"

Is it ungrammatical to say "play piano"?

And also, can we say both "practice piano" and "practice the piano"?

A native American speaker told me that the word piano functions differently in the phrases "practice piano" and "play the piano". With the verb play, "the piano" means "a musical instrument". On the other hand, with the verb practice, the word "piano" means an activity like soccer (practice soccer). Hence, we need to drop the article "the". (Did I use the conjunction "Hence" correctly?)

Is this explanation sound? Do native Americans actually say "practice piano"?

Which one is standard English?

2. A: I watched TV last night.
B: I was just wondering. How often do you watch it?

Can we ever replace the word TV (in watch TV) with the pronoun "it"?

3. Lastly, can we ever use the word quirky to describe non-human noouns as in quirky adjectives and articles?

Thanks guys!

Edit: Modified title. CJ
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lagatawIs it ungrammatical to say "play piano"?
I consider it "borderline" grammatical. I understand it as a lower register way of saying "play the piano". Likewise for "practice piano" / "practice the piano" / "practice playing the piano".
lagatawA native American speaker
A native American is someone from among the original people who populated this continent before Europeans discovered it -- also known as an Indian. I think you mean a native speaker of American English.
lagatawHence, we need to drop the article "the". (Did I use the conjunction "Hence" correctly?)
Yes.
lagatawIs this explanation sound? Do native Americans actually say "practice piano"?
I like my explanation better! Some of us actually say that. Yes.
lagatawWhich one is standard English?
I would argue that "practice the piano", "practice playing the piano", and "play the piano" are standard. Others may have different opinions.
lagataw2. A: I watched TV last night.
B: I was just wondering. How often do you watch it?

Can we ever replace the word TV (in watch TV) with the pronoun "it"?
Yes. I don't see why not, but I'm just as happy to leave out "it" in that example.
lagataw3. Lastly, can we ever use the word quirky to describe non-human noouns as in quirky adjectives and articles?
Yes.

CJ
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you. Thank you very much CJ.

Yep, why didn't it occur to me that native Americans are actually the likes of Pocahontas (I suppose)?!
But I often hear the phrase "native speaker". This has a reference in the real world, doesn't it? But how do I know what nationality that native speaker is? Can't I say native American speaker and native Britsih speaker?

Doesn't it matter whether I capitalize N in "native" or not? 'cuz my high school English teacher told me, if I want to refer to Pocahontas' kind, I should always capitalize N.
CalifJimA native American is someone from among the original people who populated this continent before Europeans discovered it -- also known as an Indian. I think you mean a native speaker of American English.
Oh sorry. I didn't read it carefully. The right term should be a native speaker of American English. Ignore my previous comment. Forgive my ignorance.

This is valuable information.
Thanks very much again CJ.
lagatawDoesn't it matter whether I capitalize N in "native" or not?
I don't know. I've never thought about it. Whatever the case, whether I see Native American or native American, I think of Pocahontas. To avoid a possible misunderstanding I always keep native and speakerright next to each other with no words in between. Emotion: smile

CJ

P.S. I have modified your title for you. Everybody will know what you intended to say. It's not that serious a problem.
Try out our live chat room.
Thank you very much.

And thanks for this forum. It's helped me a lot!