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Hello,

Suppose I write a paragaraph in which I indicate three conclusions, as saying:

....... First, bla bla.... Second, bla bla.

Would it be appropriate to start the second conclusion just after the end of the first conclusion or would it be more appropriate to start a new line for the second conclusion.

Actually my question boils down to, "when I should start a new line inside a paragraph".

As far as I know, if I am introducing a new thing in the context of the paragraph, I should start a new line. If this is correct, then I should start a new line for my second conclusion. However, as I always see in academic papers, the conclusions are written one after the other.

What is really the correct thing to do?

Thanks in advance.
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Hi,

Can you please provide a short example of the kind of paragraph you are talking about?

Thanks, Clive
Sure. Here it is:

Would it be like this:

Two inferences can be drawn. First, subsequent moves from
employmenet means that bla bla.....Second, the likelihood of a stay in ...bla.

Or like this:

Two inferences can be drawn. First, subsequent moves from bla bla.....
Second, the likelihood of a stay in ...bla.
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A new line is a new paragraph. You can choose to either keep "Second, blah blah..." in the same paragraph, or start a new paragraph, including skipping the line in between. You should NOT simply hit a carriage return and keep it in the same paragraph.

If the first inference is quite lengthy, I would recommend starting a new paragraph for the second one.
> A new line is a new paragraph. You can choose to either keep "Second, blah blah..." in the same paragraph, or start a new paragraph, including skipping the line in between.

My question is not this. Suppose it is the case that I have to remain in the same paragraph.

I am asking if I should make a new line for the second conclusion in the same paragraph or if I should continue jsut after the end of the first conclusion.
If you make a new line, you have made a new paragraph. There is no in-between of the same paragraph but with a new line.

Either skip a line and start a new paragraph properly, OR just keep going after the first one, but do NOT start a new line within the same block of text and call it the same paragraph.
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Hello,

I appreciate your reply but there is sth I dont understand.

You mention that a new line is a paragraph.

For me this is not right.

A new paragraph starts with a line break.

If there is no line break but it is a new line, this is something else. And as far as I know a new line (without a line break) can be used to introduce a new thing but in the context of the paragraph.

So, I am quite surprised that you mention a new line without a break is still a new paragraph. This I can not understand.

And it does not make sense because then I can write a page with no line breaks but new lines. And nobody can easily follow ideas....
I don't know how to say this any more clearly.

There is no such thing as a parapraph that has more than one "new line" in it.

Here is one paragraph.

Here is another paragraph.

It is not correct to have a paragraph that begins on a new line
And then has another new line.
Unless you are writing poetry.

If you want to start a new line, start an ENTIRELY NEW paragraph, and skip a line in between. Do NOT start a new line and consider that you have "kept" it as part of the prior paragraph.
Hi Exciter,

GG is giving you a good explanation.

If you are still having trouble relating it to what you are doing, why don't you do what I originally suggested? ie Post here an example of the kind of writing you are thinking about.

Best wishes, Clive
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