Hello,
I'm interested in how words have evolved over the centuries, taking on new meanings, spellings and pronunciations, and even dropping out of existence.
I've set up a place to collect my ramblings online. "Lost for Words" is an etymologicon of sorts - a collection of words, word origins, and other interesting bits of linguistic trivia that I've come across.

My most recent entries look at the following:
* how "newt" and "eft" - two words with the same meaning - evolved from the same Old English word
* interesting entries from OED's most recent update * how the syllables in verbs ending "-ate" have collectively shifted in stress
http://etymolog.blogspot.com /
Leave me a comment or suggestion.
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Hello, I'm interested in how words have evolved over the centuries, taking on new meanings, spellings and pronunciations, and even ... * how the syllables in verbs ending "-ate" have collectively shifted in stress http://etymolog.blogspot.com / Leave me a comment or suggestion.

A lot of what I see there is /very/ familiar.
I do hope you're not "borrowing" material.
I'm not sure I understand. Everything there is my own writing. There's only so many ways one can write about the etymology of a given word, and most of it will be similar to other sources. Nevertheless, I cite all my sources in each entry.
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My most recent entries look at the following: * how "newt" and "eft" - two words with the same meaning - evolved from the same Old English word

I've never seen a newt that wasn't sober. Odd, that.

Mike M
My most recent entries look at the following: * how ... same meaning - evolved from the same Old English word

I've never seen a newt that wasn't sober. Odd, that.

But do they wake up the next morning feeling eft?

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org For an e-mail address, see my web page.
I've never seen a newt that wasn't sober. Odd, that.

How did you know? I've never seen a newt that could recite "The Leith police dismisseth us" to demonstrate its sobriety.
Katy
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I've never seen a newt that wasn't sober. Odd, that.

How did you know? I've never seen a newt that could recite "The Leith police dismisseth us" to demonstrate its sobriety.

I doubt whether they can walk in straight lines either. And imagine trying to breathalyse a newt...

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I've never seen a newt that wasn't sober. Odd, that.

How did you know? I've never seen a newt that could recite "The Leith police dismisseth us" to demonstrate its sobriety.

How can "police" be construed as singular in that sentence?
How did you know? I've never seen a newt that could recite "The Leith police dismisseth us" to demonstrate its sobriety.

How can "police" be construed as singular in that sentence?

Because it means the same as 'constabulary'. The Leith Police is a single entity in just the same way that the New York Yankees is.
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