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In English, it is frowned upon, but not actually wrong, to end a sentence with a preposition. For example:

I know where they came from. (informal, but extremely common)
I know from where they came. (formal)

What is the situation in other languages? Can you end a sentence with a preposition in French? In German? In Russian? In Chinese?

To all you guys out there who can speak more than one language, maybe you could help me out this time?

Rommie
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Comments  (Page 2) 
>> In a linguistics book I have at hand, I found the following partical list of the languages that allow and disallow a preposition to be left behind.
> (1) Languages that allow a preposition to be left behind:
English, Frisian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
> (2) Languages that do not allow a preposition to be left behind:
Greek, ***, Dutch, Yiddish, Russian, Polish, Czeck, Bulgarian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene, Persian, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, Hebrew, Moroccan Arabic, Basque

*For German, it's true for standard German only which especially means written German. In spoken German however it's (become) very common (already) to leave a preposition in the end of a sentence - a lot of people do that.

Interesting that also Dutch is listed in that category, because according to grammar, it's usually closer related to English than to German... hmm... I'll try to get some info about that.

Best,
Pemmican
Dear Pemmican:

A German example cited there is:
(1) Wem hat sie mit gesprochen?
'who has she spoken with'

The following is a Dutch example, in case you understand it:
(2) Wie heeft zij mee gesproken?
'who has she spoken with'

(1) and (2) are supposed to be bad. Do you agree?

Best,
CuriousT
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Dear Rommie:

Glad I was able to reciprocate your help.

CuriousT
Hi Curious, the German example is wrong, you're right.
>>A German example cited there is:
(1) Wem hat sie mit gesprochen?
'who has she spoken with'
>>The following is a Dutch example, in case you understand it:
(2) Wie heeft zij mee gesproken?
'who has she spoken with'

>>(1) and (2) are supposed to be bad. Do you agree?

I do, CuriousT - I'm not sure for the Dutch example though.

It has to be "Mit wem hat sie gesprochen?"

The German example is a special one as "Mit wem" only refers to people, while "Womit" would refer to things - and in that case, the preposition can be left behind:

Standard: "Womit hat sie gesprochen?" ("What with has she spoken?")
informal: "Wo hat sie mit gesprochen?" ("What has she spoken with?")

-> Both sentences would refer to the apparat she used, while she was speaking with someone, e.g. a telephone or a walkie-talkie. (Just in case you were wondering).
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