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Although both are used here, it may be that the ... with our proximity to Quebec - but i don't know.

Good Lord, no. "Erb" is the predominant US pronunciation indeed, I'd go so far as to say that the 'h' pronunciation is substandard in AmE.

Well, that's good. All this talk of "herb" had me worried. I do hear "herb" more than i used to. Now i can tell those speakers they are "eccentric". (They'll say "Huh?")
ER Lyon
The predominant pronunciation in the US is the one without the (h), as can be seen under the entry for "herb" in the *Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary* (where "also" is used to indicate a rarer variant than would be the case when "or" is used):

From www.m-w.com . The ampersand is used in that dictionary to

represent the schwa. Pronunciation: '&rb, US also and British usually 'h&rb

Should really be British usually 'h&b (or in IPA-ASCII /[email protected]:b/ ).

Alan Jones
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
And yet "a historical" feels so blunt to say. "An historical" is smoother, easier. I also tend to say "an Hispanic..."

I don't think I say "an historical", but I do occasionally say "an 'istorian". I don't use the word "Hispanic" much and never as a noun.

Rob Bannister
Well, that's good. All this talk of "herb" had me worried. I do hear "herb" more than i used to. Now i can tell those speakers they are "eccentric". (They'll say "Huh?")

"Huh" or "Uh"?

Rob Bannister
The predominant pronunciation in the US is the one without ... Pronunciation: '&rb, US also and British usually 'h&rb

Should really be British usually 'h&b (or in IPA-ASCII /[email protected]:b/ ).

In Maine, many natives drop after vowels. So that makes it . =20
ER Lyon
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Well, that's good. All this talk of "herb" had me ... tell those speakers they are "eccentric". (They'll say "Huh?")

"Huh" or "Uh"?

They pronounce .
Actually, "Uh?" is out there. too.
ER Lyon
"Huh" or "Uh"?

They pronounce . Actually, "Uh?" is out there. too.

Uh-huh.

Bob Lieblich
Who capitalizes "I"
In my earlier post i replaced the schwa with an because it's tedious to copy each in. Also, looks so much like that seemed more reasonable. Does anyone know how to get a schwa on the keyboard ?

I suppose you're asking for one of those fancy Unicode characters, but those don't display on my screen or many others'. In the quoted material above, I twice see a question mark in angle brackets. Whether that is changed or preserved in this reply is all part of the game.

But around here, what we use for a schwa is @. The ASCII IPA symbols are explained at the AUE website.
(PS - how do you pronounce "xerlome"?)

Best wishes Donna Richoux
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The predominant pronunciation in the US is the one without ... Pronunciation: '&rb, US also and British usually 'h&rb

Yeah, as in the Collegiate 11th Edition (online is the 10th). Strange, isn't it, that M-W would use an ampersand ... that seemed more reasonable. Does anyone know how to get a schwa on the keyboard ? =20 ER Lyon

Didn't know it was possible even in a text editor. You astound me.

=20
Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
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