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Well, that's good. All this talk of "herb" had me ... tell those speakers they are "eccentric". (They'll say "Huh?")

Martha Stewart is one person who has championed the 'h' pronunciation, I believe.

So there wouldn't be as much of that if it weren't for her ?

All the more reason for me to stay with "erb".
ER Lyon
First, your post quotes Iskandar Baharuddin but assigns it to me:
There is the very plausible view that the addition of ... of disupute in the early part of the 19th century.

Then my lines were left without quotes so it looks like you wrote them:
So, there were activists thinking "we'd better pronounce it "herb" to get rid of this Frenchy silent " ? That's commitment.

Now here's you:
Food faddists often take on a job of correcting everyone's pronunciation and other usage.

I've never noticed this. I'm a health food nut and i'm very lenient on usage (though not on all things...).
Julia Child, after decades of trying, did not really make a dent in the American "'erb". She promoted the "herb" (aspirate h) pronunciation, in spite of also promoting herself in her shows and her cook books as "The French Chef".

But she must have influenced some. It's inevitable with TV. She and Martha Stewart and who else contributed to this minority pronunciation ? No wonder it seemed so unnatural to me. I never watched them.

ER Lyon
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
They pronounce . Actually, "Uh?" is out there. too.

Uh-huh.

And "Eh?" (rhymes with bed)
ER Lyon
"A hysterectomy" seems okay. Not "a historical occasion. It's something ... strongly, i can see how it would seem natural.

Is the first syllable of hysterectomy really much more accented than that of historical?

More accented than the second. That's the critical factor.

ER Lyon
234,000 Google hits on "an Hispanic'. Mostly adjectival. as "...Democrats ... Hispanic" seems normal to me both as adjective and noun.

Actually, it's pretty clear that in AmE "Hispanic" has been losing out to "Latino" for quite a while, rather like "Oriental" disappeared in favor of "Asian".

Maybe so, but Google shows 107,000,000 for "Hispanic" and 85,300,000 for "Latino".
This is a subject for another thread. Maybe tomorrow.

ER Lyon
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Didn't know it was possible even in a text editor. You astound me.

I thought it was. What is astounding to me is that long lists of keyboard alt codes for diacritical, foreign, ... some people's systems are primative. Here's a Sanscrit character: . Can you see it ? Can anyon=e ? ER Lyon

I could see the upside-down e and I can see a character that looks a=20 little like a Chinese character above, which MS Word could not interpret =

(Word gave me an empty box when I pasted it). I'm using Mozilla as my=20 newsreader and browser. It lets me read those characters, but I don't=20 know how to write them.
=20
Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
They pronounce . Actually, "Uh?" is out there. too.

Uh-huh.

Eh?
(Obligatory, in case you were wondering.)

Odysseus
In my earlier post i replaced the schwa with an ... know how to get a schwa on the keyboard ?

Didn't know it was possible even in a text editor. You astound me.[/nq]It's easy enough to access characters from the IPA, Greek, Cyrillic, and so on on any modern system equipped with Unicode fonts, or on an older system with specialized fonts or language software. Other people with the same kind of system or software should also be able to see them in files you create and transfer to them on disk or over a network. What's hard is representing them in Usenet, which was designed to use the 'lowest common denominator' of plain text.

The character set being used can be identified in message headers, but old-fashioned newsreaders or systems lacking the necessary fonts can't make use of such information. Were I reading this group with MT-NW or Thunderbird on my Mac OS X system at work, I'm sure xerlome's character in angle-brackets above would have come across, but here at home, where I'm using an old version of Netscape under OS 9, it's garbled. (I don't know what it will look like to you in the quotation.

Some newsreaders display question marks or just omit what they don't understand, while this one tries to interpret each byte as an ASCII character: in this case I see "É", a capital E bearing an acute accent, followed by "™", a trademark symbol. Here you'll probably be able to see my E-acute, because it's part of the ISO-Latin extended character set and you're apparently using a fairly modern reader that supports UTF-8, but I'm less confident anyone not using a Mac will be able to see the TM.)

Odysseus
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Didn't know it was possible even in a text editor. You astound me.

It's easy enough to access characters from the IPA, Greek, Cyrillic, and so on on any modern system equipped with ... reader that supports UTF-8, but I'm less confident anyone not using a Mac will be able to see the TM.)

I see the cap E acute and the TM using Mozilla under Windows XP.

I can't write them, however, because I have not investigated whether any =

settings in Mozilla allow me to access them.
=20
Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
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