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Greetings to everyone!

I would like to consult you about the following usage of articles in "The Lord of the Rings":

"The Sun grew misty as the day grew old, until it gleamed in a(?) pale sky..."

There is one certain sky above, why is it referred to with an indefinite article?

Thanks in advance,
Anton
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Hi,
I would like to consult you about the following usage of articles in "The Lord of the Rings":

"The Sun grew misty as the day grew old, until it gleamed in a(?) pale sky..."

There is one certain sky above, why is it referred to with an indefinite article?

Tolkien is thinking that there are different kinds of sky.
eg a pale sky, a red sky, a blue sky, a dark sky, etc.

It's a rather poetic, literary usage.

Clive
There are numerous expression in which an adjectival attribute brings on a/an:

He had lunch. - He had an early lunch.

Birds were flying in the sky. - Birds were flying in a blue sky.

We saw George Bush on television. - We saw a sad George Bush on television.

CB
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Cool Breeze There are numerous expression in which an adjectival attribute brings on a/an:
It still seems to fly in the face of prescriptivism. We could also look at an album of Bush pictures, and say "This is the angry Bush, this is the thoughtful Bush, this is the confused Bush." Any thoughts on definite vs. indefinite?

I'm very comfortable with either usage, BTW. I'm just wondering how you answer questions like this.
Hi,
We could also look at an album of Bush pictures, and say "This is the angry Bush, this is the thoughtful Bush, this is the confused Bush." Any thoughts on definite vs. indefinite?

I'm very comfortable with either usage, BTW. I'm just wondering how you answer questions like this.

Well, here's one line of thinking to consider.
If it's well known that there is a confused Bush, you could well say 'the confused Bush' as a specific reference to what is well known.

But if you don't think Bush is well known to be thoughtful, don't say 'the thoughtful Bush'.

(Anyway, the latter expression sounds like an oxymoron, doesn't it? )

Clive
Very good, Clive! Thanks.
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Hi, if someone says somethng is an oxymoron, does it have to be a phrase like "cruel kindness" or can a context or situation justify it being such?
Hi,

Generally speaking, it needs to be 'a set of words'. But it does not have to be just two words, although two-word oxymorons are often quoted.

Clive
The example Clive gave was context driven rather than logic driven.
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