+0
'Why both Sartre and Camus should have been so keenly aware of the absurd about the same time is one of those mysteries of the zeitgeist time spirit: that we are still far from solving. Camus always had a strongly lyrical feeling for the material world-sunlight, sea, sex- so that his consciousness of the absurd was an intermittent feeling, occurring only in moments of metaphysical interrogation. Also, as he came from the working classs, he did not look upon it so much as a social stratum but rather as a highly differentiated reality, made up of irreducible individuals. In other words, his intellectualism, which was genuine and had moreover been developed by philosophical studies at the university level, was tempered by pragmatism and a sense of inarticualate values. Poverty, tuberculosis, and a feeling for human solidarity made him much more of an ordinary man than Sartre, the ferociously dedicated intellectual, whose professed aim is to translate everything into words, so that formulated truths can react on society. '

especially the highlighted areas...

please help me... i am trying to challenge myself into achieving a higher level of english skills... ^^
Comments  
JKBelieve'Why both Sartre and Camus should have been so keenly aware of the absurd about the same time is one of those mysteries of the zeitgeist time spirit: that we are still far from solving.

We do not know why there are times when a particular philosophical issue comes to the fore. But it did happen that Satre and Camus simultaneously considered the idea of the absurd.

Camus always had a strongly lyrical feeling for the material world-sunlight, sea, sex- so that his consciousness of the absurd was an intermittent feeling, occurring only in moments of metaphysical interrogation.

Camus had a strong emotional feeling for the material world. It was only when he put that feeling aside and considered life philosophically that he appreciated the absurdities of life.

Also, as he came from the working classs, he did not look upon it so much as a social stratum but rather as a highly differentiated reality, made up of irreducible individuals.

Having come from the working class, Camus did not view the people of that class as being all the same (as an upper-class person might). Rather, he knew them to be unique individuals. To group them in one class would be erroneous thinking.

In other words, his intellectualism, which was genuine and had moreover been developed by philosophical studies at the university level, was tempered by pragmatism and a sense of inarticualate values.

Camus' intellectualism was genuine; he had been trained at the university. But, having come from the working class, he was less likely to be seduced by outlandish, impractical philosophies than an ivory-tower philosopher. He also inherited from that working class a feeling that values may be legitimate even if they are not plainly stated.

Poverty, tuberculosis, and a feeling for human solidarity made him much more of an ordinary man than Sartre, the ferociously dedicated intellectual, whose professed aim is to translate everything into words, so that formulated truths can react on society. '
Camus suffered as the "common man" does. And he felt that all people share a common humanity. So he thought that he already shared values with people. In contrast, Sartre pictured himself as the teacher rather than as one of the students in the class.
thank you thank you so much you've been a great help to me... ^^