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He took a photo of................

A) her

B) hers

C) their

D) his

E) my

Which do you think is correct?
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He took a photo of................A) her.
GoodmanHe took a photo of................A) her.

Is "hers" wrong?
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"Hers" means something belonging to her. But we have no idea what that might be! (No information was provided.) So, in this case, "hers" does not work for the same reason the other possibilities don't work. Only "her" is a correct answer here.
DiamondrgIs "hers" wrong?
Hello Diamond

"Hers" is an independent possessive pronoun to mean "her thing". You can use "of hers" like "He is a friend of hers" (=He is one of her friends).

"A photo of her" does not mean "a photo she possesses" but it means "a photo that depicts her face or figure". If we want to mean "a photo she possesses", we have to say "her photo". "A photo of hers" per se is not wrong grammatically if you want to mean "one of her pictures", but I don't think the phrase usually fits to the sentence you gave us. Use of sentences like "I stole a photo of hers" might be allowed in certain context, though.

paco
A, B, and D are correct.

Where 'take' means take into one's possession or steal:

He took a photo of [ hers / his ]. (He took into his possession a photo belonging to [her / him]. (he and his/him are not coreferential. If it is his already, it makes no sense for him to take it.)

Where 'take' means carry along with one:

He took a photo of [hers / his]. (He carried along with him a photo belonging to [her / him]. (Here he and his/him may be coreferential or not.)

Where 'take' means to operate a camera to produce a image:

He took a photo of [her / him]. (He operated the camera to produce an image of [her / him] (he and him cannot be coreferential. The coreferential case requires: He took a photo of himself.)

CJ
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Sorry. I was interpreting "took a photo of" to mean "used a camera to photograph." In that sense, I think "her" is the only correct answer. But it's true that someone can "take a photo" belonging to someone else (walk away with that photo). If that is the meaning, there would be several correct answers, as CalifJim pointed out.
If I were an examinee of Turkey's National Exam for English proficiency, I would take it that the examiner uses "took" in the sense of "used a camera". From my experience I have a feeling examiners rarely make such a question that three among the five choices are all correct.

paco
1. Allegra came over from Milan last week. I took a photo of her. She's pretty, isn't she?

2. Allegra and I were arguing about who had the fluffiest guinea pig. So she took a picture of hers, and I took a picture of mine, and we brought them into work for Enrico to decide. But Enrico said he had the fluffiest one of all.

3. Enrico and I were arguing about who had the fluffiest guinea pig. So he took a picture of his, and I took a picture of mine, and we brought them into work for Allegra to decide. But Allegra said she had the fluffiest one of all.

MrP
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