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I'm sure many of you have heard of words such as bras, millionaires, and princes that become brass, millionairess, and princess respectively when the letter s is added to the end.

What I'd like to know: is there is a plural noun that, when it becomes singular after the addition of an s, still retains its original meaning? Princes comes close, but there is quite an obvious difference between prince and princess.

Is there such a noun, or am I searching in vain?
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Too many conditions!

When you began with "bras" to "brass" it encouraged me to overlook the condition of retaining the original meaning, and I undertook to write a program to find all the cases where we go from plural to singular by adding "s" (of which "princess" is one.) However, your "princess" example makes your intention clear, and I realized my folly. I now suspect your search is in vain. If such existed, someone surely would have stumbled upon it by now.
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What about the word Care? If you add an S to it, it can become Cares. It goes from Plural to Singular.

They Care, to he cares. Just a thought. Good luck. Don't know if this makes a point since it is Not a NOUN, but a verb.

I came across this web site while searching for help in solving the riddle below. Decades ago I knew the answer, but it is now lost in the mists of time. I know about Millionaires and Princes, but these do not fit the rest of the riddle.

A NOUN THERE IS OF PLURAL NUMBER

OPPOSED TO PEACE AND TRANQUIL SLUMBER

NOW ANY OTHER NOUN YOU TAKE

WHEN ADDING "S" YOU PLURAL MAKE

BUT WHEN YOU ADD AN "S" TO THIS

STRANGE IS THE METAMORPHOSIS

PLURAL NOW IS PLURAL NO MORE

AND SWEET WHAT WAS BITTER BEFORE


Any suggestions, anybody?