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manque

: short of or frustrated in the fulfillment of one's aspirations or talents -used postpositively <a poet manqué>
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

"He is a poet manque" - Does it mean that "He" has/had the potential of becoming a good poet but the fate has/had something else written for him, therefore "He" is/was generally not recognized as a poet; there are/were only a few persons who are/were aware of his genius?

Is it pronounced 'man-kay' or 'man-key'?

Please help me.
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Hi,
manque

: short of or frustrated in the fulfillment of one's aspirations or talents -used postpositively <a poet manqué>
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

"He is a poet manque" - Does it mean that "He" has/had the potential of becoming a good poet but the fate has/had something else written for him, therefore "He" is/was generally not recognized as a poet; there are/were only a few persons who are/were aware of his genius?

It doesn't just suggest potential. It suggests that he has tried to some extent but has failed to achieve success.

Is it pronounced 'man-kay' or 'man-key'? The former.

Clive
Thank you.
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manque
formal - used to describe what a person could or should have been but never was ▪ He works as a cook but thinks of himself as a poet manqué. ▪ an artist manqué
[M-W's Learner's Dictionary]

The previous definition from M-W's Collegiate does suggest that the person has tried to some extent, "short of or frustrated in...". But I suspect the Learner's definition has no such implication. Correct? The part "but thinks of himself as a poet manque" has a suggestion of self-importance.

"could or should" - I don't understand the use of 'could' and 'should' in this context. He could have been a good author but the destiny let him travel the path of a gambler. He should have been a good author but???

Please help me.
Hi,
manque
formal - used to describe what a person could or should have been but never was ▪ He works as a cook but thinks of himself as a poet manqué. ▪ an artist manqué
[M-W's Learner's Dictionary]

The previous definition from M-W's Collegiate does suggest that the person has tried to some extent, "short of or frustrated in...". But I suspect the Learner's definition has no such implication. Correct? True The part "but thinks of himself as a poet manque" has a suggestion of self-importance. Yes. Sounds like he thinks he could have been a poet, but he didn't bother to try.

"could or should" - I don't understand the use of 'could' and 'should' in this context. He could have been a good author but the destiny let him travel the path of a gambler. He should have been a good author but???

Sometimes no real difference is intended, but here's the general idea.

He could have been a successful author. Soinds like he had the ability. But maybe he didn't try.
He should have been a successful author. Sounds like he wrote well, but perhaps eg he got unfair reviews that stopped people from buying his books.

Clive
Jackson6612manque
One of my professors (a Canadian) scribbled the word (essentially French) on one of my paragraphs.
For some reason I had thought the French verb "manquer" meant "to miss," but I believe I was wrong.
I took the criticism to mean that he understood what I was trying to do,
but he felt that I had failed (missed the mark/target).

I don't quite understand why the adjective is popularly appended to "poet."
Maybe it means "a failed poet," or "a would-be poet."
Perhaps the whole expression was originally French, which could explain the word order.

Merriam-Webster treats it as an English adjective, but uses the acute accent.

- A.
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Avangi, you do know where I encountered this "manque". Don't you?!
AvangiOne of my professors (a Canadian) scribbled the word (essentially French) on one of my paragraphs.
For some reason I had thought the French verb "manquer" meant "to miss," but I believe I was wrong.
I took the criticism to mean that he understood what I was trying to do,
but he felt that I had failed (missed the mark/target).
What did your professor really intend to say? Didn't you miss the main point?
AvangiMerriam-Webster treats it as an English adjective, but uses the acute accent.
Isn't it a loaned word? That accent mark on the "e" indicates that. Aren't there many such words which have been fully assimilated into English language but still retain many of original characteristics such as accent marks?

Please guide me.
I'll have to study. Emotion: nodding
Mon-kay xx
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