In English grammar, we learned that after a preposition, there is a noun. However, almost every native speaker would not deny the fact that

"He rose from under the bed."
this sentence sounds correct with no mistake concerning grammar. (right?) Then is there any explanation for this sentence?
In other words, is this sentence merely an unusual exception, or is there a possible rule to such a happening?
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In English grammar, we learned that after a preposition, there is a noun.

Or something that can act as a noun, such as a pronoun.
However, almost every native speaker would not deny the fact that "He rose from under the bed." this sentence sounds correct with no mistake concerning grammar. (right?)

Right.
Then is there any explanation for this sentence?

Prepositional phrases usually act as adjectives or adverbs, but they can also act as nouns. Here's a phrase as the subject of a verb: "Under the bed is a dusty place."
is there a possible rule to such a happening?

If there's a rule for which phrases can act as what parts of speech, I don't know what it is.

Mark Brader "So the American government went to IBM Toronto to come up with a data encryption standard (Email Removed) and they came up with...?" "EBCDIC!"

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Here's a phrase as the subject of a verb: "Under the bed is a dusty place."

Very nicely observed, Mark: I don't think I'd ever noticed that before.

Mike.
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Here's a phrase as the subject of a verb: "Under the bed is a dusty place."

Very nicely observed, Mark: I don't think I'd ever noticed that before.

I did just yesterday afternoon. I was surprised since I'd swept it out only two weeks ago.
Prepositional phrases usually act as adjectives or adverbs, but they can also act as nouns.

Or verbs. I won an argument with my son and said triumphantly, "In your face!"
He approached me threateningly and said, "I'll in your face you!"

Hurray for English.
\\P. Schultz
Okay, okay, in the original question we have a prepositional phrase functioning as the object of another preposition. That's what I would have said if all you other learned folk hadn't beat me to it.

Now, would someone please draw me a diagram of how someone rises from under the bed? I can see crawling out from under the bed and then getting off the floor, but that's not "rising" in my dictionary. Or do the box spring and mattress rise with the riser? That's what's we really need to know.

Bob Lieblich
Rising from the bedding, maybe
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Now, would someone please draw me a diagram of how someone rises from under the bed? I can see crawling out from under the bed and then getting off the floor, but that's not "rising" in my dictionary...

It seems possible to me if he started out, say, face down and on his elbows rather than flat on the floor; then the crawling out and the starting to stand up could all be done in one motion. Of course, with some beds and some people there wouldn't be enough clearance to do that.
Or he might be a ghost, capable of passing through solid objects!
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Or something that can act as a noun, such as ... of a verb: "Under the bed is a dusty place."

Okay, okay, in the original question we have a prepositional phrase functioning as the object of another preposition. That's what ... my dictionary. Or do the box spring and mattress rise with the riser? That's what's we really need to know.

Huh. I'm a student who have the same question which we are discussing about.

She said 'rose from under the bed' as a example of the usage of 'preposition

before prepositional phrase' so you don't need to focus on what it really mean.

-)
If you want to understand that the expression 'crawling out from under the bed'

is more reasonable, then you correct it and please let me know what is the rule

in it.. Please help us to understand..
Or something that can act as a noun, such as ... of a verb: "Under the bed is a dusty place."

Okay, okay, in the original question we have a prepositional phrase functioning as the object of another preposition. That's what ... my dictionary. Or do the box spring and mattress rise with the riser? That's what's we really need to know.

Hello~ :-)
I'm the student who have the same question.
she said that expression as a example of the usage of 'prepositional phrase after preosition' so you don't need to focus on what it really means.

If you want to correct the expression from 'rise from under the bed' to 'crawl from under the bed', you will do. :-)
what we are curious about is whether or not there is a rule to make the sentence

using prepositional phrase after another preposition.

Please halp us again..
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