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Hello. While writing a short story, I wanted to express the thought that the local news had made a report on a missing girl. I came up with three ones:

1)News reported that the girl missed

2)News reported on the girl's missing

3)News reported on the girl's having missed

But when I typed out these three in a translator to check if they were correct, only the first one was considered to be proper. Can you please tell me why? Why can't the possessive gerund be used here? Thanks!

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They're all wrong.

The local newspaper/radio station reported that the girl was missing.

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Oops, looks like it is because of my inattentiveness. But, can you please tell if the ones containing gerunds can work in the sentence you have remade?

No. There is no natural way to convert or use "the missing girl" into the gerund form.

One possibility of "missing" used as a noun is this:

The girl's deep depression was due to her missing her mother, who had died recently.

AlpheccaStars

No. There is no natural way to convert or use "the missing girl" into the gerund form.

One possibility of "missing" used as a noun is this:

The girl's deep depression was due to her missing her mother, who had died recently.

Your example raises an interesting point of grammar, AS, in that "missing" must be a verb because it has an NP direct object, i.e. "her mother", and also it can be pre-modified by an adverb like "constantly" but not by the equivalent adjective "constant". Nouns don't take direct objects or adverbial modifiers:

The girl's deep depression was due to her *constant / occasionally missing her mother.

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A counterpoint: The possessive pronoun "her" can be argued as modifying "missing." Verbs do not take possessive modifiers (determiners.)

For the poster:

Traditional and modern (contemporary) grammarians use different labels here. BillJ's is from the perspective of contemporary linguistics, in which "missing" is a verb (with its complements and modifiers) and the non-finite clause is the complement of the preposition. The subject of a non-finite verb can be in the possessive form.

Traditional grammar is not as precise. I have read the words "gerund" and "noun" and "phrase" for this context, depending on the source.

I appreciate the contemporary analysis because it seems much more precise and consistent. However, many English books and ESL teachers use the traditional grammar terminology.
Reading different sources without an appreciation of the developments in linguistics over the past few decades can be very confusing.