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1. I devoted myself to study and to explore by wisdom all that is done under heaven.

Ecclesiastes 1:13 (New International Version)

2. I devoted myself to study and to exploring by wisdom all that is done under heaven.

Ecclesiastes 1:13 (my own version)

Since to is a preposition in 'devote oneself to,' I think that sentence # 1 is incorrect. Am I right?

Thank you very much for your reply.
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Comments  
Yes, you are right! Since "study" can be used as a noun, it can remain as "study". Nevertheless, if you wanted to think of it as a verb, it could be written as "... devoted myself to studying and (to) exploring ...".
CJ
Merriam-Webster's 10th edition defines "to" with the infinitive under "preposition" (sense 8). I'm having trouble understanding why that would be, especially since prepositions are supposed to take substantives as objects. However, as a Greek teacher, I understand the infinitive as a "verbal noun," so that might legitimize "to" as a preposition in that context. Still, the infinitive is classified as a verb, but it is a verb as action or event, which makes the whole construction ("to see," "to touch," etc.) a "noun," and the "to" can't really be separated from it as a separate part of speech IMHO.

Scott Stocking
Adjunct Professor of Greek
Lincoln Christian College
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Scottsoxdefines "to" with the infinitive under "preposition" (sense 8). I'm having trouble understanding why that would be
Hmmm. I don't understand either why that was given. Most grammarians would not classify that to as a preposition.
In some systems it is called the infinitival particle. In some transformational grammars it is considered to function as an inflection.
CJ
Hi guys,

Here's the King James version. As you can see, it too uses two base infinitives ('seek and 'search out').
13 And I gave my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven: this sore travail hath God given to the sons of man to be exercised therewith.
I wonder if the two different teams of translators felt constrained by whatever is in the original text?

What do you think, Scott?

Best wishes, Clive
I think that the only problem with the second sentence is that it is not parallel.  Devote can be complemented by the infinitive, as in I devoted myself to study, but devote can also be complemented by a prepositional phrase beginning with to.  E.g. I devoted myself to figuring out the solution to the problem.  However, because we tend to try to make structures centring around the words and and but parallel (follow the same grammatical structure), it is more correct to repeat the infinitive.
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I agree with the previous post that the original author's translation isn't precisely parallel. "Study" may either be a noun or a verb, but if you want to use "exploring," then you should use "studying" too to keep both of them as gerunds/participles. The Hebrew text of the verse uses a pair of infinitive constructs, which, if my rusty Hebrew knowledge is reliable, implies the substantive use of the infinitive: the process of studying and the process of seeking out. (Interestingly enough, the Hebrew forms are prefixed with the Hebrew preposition "to." If Solomon wanted to emphasize the verbal aspect, he could have used an intensive construction in Hebrew, which, literally translated in English, would sound something like "he studied, studying, and sought, seeking.") The Septuagint text uses articular infinitives (that is, the infinitive with the definite article) for both, which would again imply the substantive nature of the infinitive rather than using the infinitive simply to complete the verb phrase.

Scott
richard_sDevote can be complemented by the infinitive
That doesn't seem correct, at least not in American English.
???Karen devoted herself to sew three dresses last week.
Does that occur often in other varieties of English?
CJ
Yeah you are right, that is wrong (my bad).  I guess then that study is the noun form of the word, which means explore is wrong and it should be exploring or exploration.  
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