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Look at this sentence :

1. We are going a long way ahead; let's wait for ........ to catch up with us.

a) the others b) others c) other d) another

I believe the correct choice is either "a" or "b". However, a friend of mine has a firm belief that the correct choice is "a" and not "b"
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Hi,

Look at this sentence :



1. We are going a long way ahead; let's wait for .. to catch up with us.

a) the others b) others c) other d) another

I believe the correct choice is either "a" or "b". However, a friend of mine has a firm belief that the correct choice is "a" and not "b"

In a suitable context, a, b and even d are all grammatically possible. But I'm sure that the tester expects you to choose a as the most lilkly collocation.

Best wishes, Clive
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If you are getting ahead, you are getting ahead of someone, ahead of some other people, ahead of some specific other people, not just anybody who happens to show up.
So if you get ahead, you may need to wait for the others (whom you are getting ahead of) -- not just any other people that happen to be around.

CJ
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Comments  
Dear Clive,

What if the exam taker chooses "b"? Is this choice wrong?

Best wishes, Essam
Hi,

It's not wrong. But in this type of test, you usually have to pick what the examiner thinks is the correct or most likely answer.

The phrase going a long way ahead makes me think that in this particular case the examiner may not even be a native English speaker. More natural is getting a long way ahead.

Clive
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.