+0

They threatened to shoot him and..............him of all his possessions.

a) rob b) robbed

I go for ;b;. Am I right?

+0
Omar AhmedI go for ;b;. Am I right?

It's theoretically possible, but it seems very strange not to keep both parts the same in terms of verb form:

They threatened to

........................................... shoot him
and
they threatened to
............................................ rob him of all his possessions.

For this reason, I would say that only a is correct if you have to choose only one answer in an exam setting.

CJ

Comments  

I would go for 'A' because of the 'to' usage. But take the correct answer from the teachers.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

They are both possible.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Isn't it better to say "They threatened to shoot him. After that, they robbed him of his possessions."?

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Omar Ahmed

Isn't it better to say "They threatened to shoot him. After that, they robbed him of his possessions."?

If that's what you mean, yes, but not if you mean that they threatened to shoot him and they threatened to rob him.

Threatening to do something doesn't mean you will necessarily do it.

CJ

I understood from your answer that the following sentence is also correct: They threatened to shoot him and they threatened to rob him.

Did I understand you right?

Omar Ahmed

I understood from your answer that the following sentence is also correct: They threatened to shoot him and they threatened to rob him.

Did I understand you right?

Yes. In fact, that's the meaning that native speakers take from the sentence

They threatened to shoot him and rob him.

The second 'they threatened to' is implied.

Another example: I decided to cook it and eat it.

It would be anomalous to say I decided to cook it and ate it.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.