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An old friend of mine is here ___________a visit _________Shanghai.
A. for; to B. for; from C. on; from D. on; to E. on; in

Which is right? I think "C" is the correct answer. What about "E"?
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I'd go for C.

For E You'd probably need to say ..."friend is in Shaghai on a visit"
Hi you all!
I would also choose C, because I use ON with VISIT. However, FOR A VISIT didn't sound wrong to me either and I looked it up in the Websters. There was a sentence: "The neighbors dropped in for a short visit."

My question to all native speakers is: Do you say FOR A VISIT? Would you use B in the example above?
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The preposition "for" has several meanings. In this case it means "the purpose" - so he came with the purpose of paying us a visit.
Hello guys

I agree that the answer must be C.

But at the first look I felt as if not E but D had been also a possible answer.
My thought was illustrated by the followings.
[1] (o) He is here on a visit from Shanghai.
[2] (o) He is now on a visit to Shanghai.
[3] (o) He is here on a visit to his son.
[4] (x) He is here on a visit to Shanghai.
'Here' and 'Shanghai'(a place name) are working as important keys in our choice.

paco
The answer "C" is the only feasible one to use from the answer choices but I, from my experiences, would like to stress that no native speaker would construct the sentence this way. They would normally write:- "An old friend of mine from Shanghai is here on a visit."
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Agree Emotion: smile
Hi, Abbie.

"In this case it means "the purpose" - so he came with the purpose of paying us a visit. "

Then if the friend has come to pay us a visit, we could use B? An old friedn of mine is here for a visit?

As for "from", I think we all agree that it should be "from", not "to".
An old friend of mine is here ___________a visit _________Shanghai.
A. for; to B. for; from C. on; from D. on; to E. on; in

Which is right? I think "C" is the correct answer. What about "E"?

Hi Miche,

Sometimes exercises can be very complicated, because they give no context, and there is only one possible answer.

Also, there are certain constructs in any language which simply sound better, even though gramatically you could say them in a different way.

In this case, it would be phsically considerably easier to say "on a visit from " rather than "For a visit fom" (try it - f v f). And we tend to say "on a visit" in this context.

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