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In 1995, the player won events such as Dormund, Linares, and Corus.

1) Is the comma after 1995 necessary, optional or wrong?

2) Would putting a comma after such as be necessary, optional or wrong?

Thanks in advance.
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AkavallIn 1995, the player won events such as Dormund, Linares, and Corus.

1) Is the comma after 1995 necessary, optional or wrong? Optional

2) Would putting a comma after such as be necessary, optional or wrong? Wrong

Thanks in advance.
Hi,

Many people, including me Emotion: smile, would also say the comma after Linares is unnecessary, or at least optional.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you for the replies, guys.

Clive
Many people, including me , would also say the comma after Linares is unnecessary, or at least optional.

Do you think it would be better to take out the comma? From what I understand, the argument for using the comma after Linares is that it clarifies that Dortmund does not consist of Corus and Linares.
Hi,

In 1995, the player won events such as Dormund, Linares, and Corus.

Do you think it would be better to take out the comma? From what I understand, the argument for using the comma after Linares is that it clarifies that Dortmund does not consist of Corus and Linares. No, removing the comma does not introduce that kind of confusion. It's just like saying I bought apples, pears and bananas.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive,

This is where I got the idea from:

"

  • A comma before the final and, or, or nor in a list of more than two things is called a serial comma or an Oxford comma:

    • We had milk, biscuits, and cream.
    • It is called the Oxford comma because the style guide of the Oxford University Press is one of its prominent advocates.
    • Although the Oxford comma is not always used, it should be applied to avoid ambiguity. Omitting the Oxford comma changes the meaning of a sentence, and unless the author is aware of the possible meaning the comma should be included rather than omitted.

      • I spoke to the boys, Sam and Tom.The boys refers to Sam and Tom.
      • I spoke to the boys, Sam, and Tom.The boys, Sam, and Tom are separate units; thus, four or more people were spoken to in all.
      • I spoke to x, y and z. This sentence is stating that y and z are what comprise x.
      • I spoke to x, y, and z. This sentence is stating that x, y, and z were all spoken to and that they are different entities. "


      • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma_(punctuation )

        Are the examples in the two bolded lines different from mine? What am I missing?
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    Hi again,

    This is where I got the idea from:

  • A comma before the final and, or, or nor in a list of more than two things is called a serial comma or an Oxford comma: Yes. Search the Forum for 'Oxford comma', and you'll get lots of discussion.

    • We had milk, biscuits, and cream.
    • It is called the Oxford comma because the style guide of the Oxford University Press is one of its prominent advocates.
    • Although the Oxford comma is not always used, it should be applied to avoid ambiguity. Omitting the Oxford comma changes the meaning of a sentence, and unless the author is aware of the possible meaning the comma should be included rather than omitted.

      • I spoke to the boys, Sam and Tom.The boys refers to Sam and Tom.
      • I spoke to the boys, Sam, and Tom.The boys, Sam, and Tom are separate units; thus, four or more people were spoken to in all.
      • I spoke to x, y and z. This sentence is stating that y and z are what comprise x. I wouldn't say that it always means this. It depends on the 'content words' in the sentence. eg If I say 'I bought apples, pears and oranges', do you think that anyone is going to think that pears and oranges comprise apples? Compare that to a sentence like 'He was friends with two American Presidents, Kennedy and Nixon'. Here, it's true that a comma after 'Kennedy' would completely change the meaning.


      • I spoke to x, y, and z. This sentence is stating that x, y, and z were all spoken to and that they are different entities. " Similarly, consider 'I spoke to Tom, Dick and Harry'. This clearly identifies three people.

        Your example was In 1995, the player won events such as Dormund, Linares, and Corus. Even without the comma, I would take this to refer to three separate events. I suggest that would be the normal interpretation. If I intended to convey to the reader the idea that Dormund consists of two parts called Linares and Corus, I wouldn't simply rely on 'no comma after Linares' to convey that idea. Such a construction, using three proper names, would be unusual.

        Best wishes, Clive
    Hi
    CliveHi,

    In 1995, the player won events such as Dormund, Linares, and Corus.

    Do you think it would be better to take out the comma? From what I understand, the argument for using the comma after Linares is that it clarifies that Dortmund does not consist of Corus and Linares. No, removing the comma does not introduce that kind of confusion. It's just like saying I bought apples, pears and bananas.

    Best wishes, Clive

    I was taught that I bought apples, pears, and bananas is AmE.

    and in BrE, the comma is not to be inserted. I have read in English usage books that this is so.

    Has there been a change in AmE usage in regard to the use of a comma in such contexts?
    Hi Clive I do agree with you but i need little clarification regarding the following

    'He was friends with two American Presidents, Kennedy and Nixon'. Here, it's true that a comma after 'Kennedy' would completely change the meaning.

    I do agree now consider the folllowing

    'He was friends with two American Presidents, Kennedy, Nixon, & a British Prime ministre Tony Bliar.

    Is the above sentence structure is right?
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