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Would I be correct to say that relative clauses:

ü modify a noun or a pronoun

ü Are either defining or non-defining

In the following sentence:

“She gave me one of the flowers which she was holding.”

The relative pronoun “which” could be omitted because flowers is the object of the relative clause.

In the following sentence:

“The book comes with a CD ROM which includes additional exercises.

Which cannot be omitted because CD ROM is the subject of the relative clause.

The two previous sentences are both relative defining clauses.

In the following sentence:

“Whichever party wins the election, income tax is likely to rise in the near future.”

The reason why “whoever” wouldn’t be acceptable, grammatically speaking, is because one out of a limited number of parties will win, thus the use of whichever.

In the following sentence:

“He climbed up , from whose peak he could see three countries.”

I don’t understand why the answer is “from whose”

According to my book, whose is used to:

When we talk about something belonging or associated with a person, animal or plant.

Not the sentence above, is neither a person, an animal or a plant, it’s a mountain. Why is “whose” the correct answer??
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Hi SOP
SeekerOfPeaceWould I be correct to say that relative clauses:

ü modify a noun or a pronoun Correct, but they can also modify a clause: He didn't say anything, which was a surprise.

ü Are either defining or non-defining Correct.

In the following sentence:

“She gave me one of the flowers which she was holding.”

The relative pronoun “which” could be omitted because flowers is the object of the relative clause. Hmmm... Correct. I would say flowers is the object of the relative pronoun. By the way, you can't omit the relative even though it is the object in non-defining relative clauses: He took a trip to Rome, which he had never seen before.

In the following sentence:

“The book comes with a CD ROM which includes additional exercises.

Which cannot be omitted because CD ROM is the subject of the relative clause. Correct. If only one CD ROM comes with the book, a comma could be used after CD ROM. Usage varies in short sentences, though. Some skillful/skilful writers may omit the relative even when it's the subject: There's somebody at the door [who] wants to see you.

The two previous sentences are both relative defining clauses. Better: defining relative clauses (also known as restrictive relative clauses).

In the following sentence:

“Whichever party wins the election, income tax is likely to rise in the near future.”

The reason why “whoever” wouldn’t be acceptable, grammatically speaking, is because one out of a limited number of parties will win, thus the use of whichever. Correct. However who and whoever can never be followed by a noun:
Who boy wouldn't like a holiday like that! WRONG.
What boy wouldn't like a holiday like that! RIGHT.


In the following sentence:

“He climbed up Mount Brecon, from whose peak he could see three countries.”

I don’t understand why the answer is “from whose”

According to my book, whose is used to:

When we talk about something belonging or associated with a person, animal or plant.

Not the sentence above, Mount Brecon is neither a person, an animal or a plant, it’s a mountain. Why is “whose” the correct answer??
The wording in your book is not very good. Whose is always possible when a relative in the genitive is needed.


Cheers
CB
Comments  
If you look at Meriam-Webster Online Dictionary, it defines "whose" as "of or relating to whom or which especially as possessor or possessors". Since there's only one possessive relative pronoun, it should be used.
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.