Is it correct to say to blind someone over something???As to keep somebody unable to see something clearly?

I know that when used as an adjective, it's supposed to be blind "to" something?

So when works as a transitive verb, does it apply in the same way, too?

Thanks to anybody who's willing to answer in advance!:)
1 2
You can keep someone in the dark, you can pull the wool over their eyes, you can keep them out of the loop; you can baffle them, dazzle them, even razzmatazz them, but generally you can't blind them.
CSnyderYou can keep someone in the dark, you can pull the wool over their eyes, you can keep them out of the loop; you can baffle them, dazzle them, even razzmatazz them, but generally you can't blind them.
Thanks for answering,

but just one more question right here. What do you mean by razzmatazzing people?

To the best of my knowledge, the word razzmatazz is a noun which means something extravagant, not a verb. So what does it mean when it serves as a verb??? To confuse them? I checked this one out in the urban dictionary already, but it doesn't indicate any other result, either. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=razzmatazz
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Razzmatazz is "[url=http://www.thefreedictionary.com/razzmatazz ]A flashy action or display intended to bewilder, confuse, or deceive.[/url]" I was simply using it as a verb meaning "to bewilder, confuse, or deceive". Turning nouns into verbs is a fairly common practice, at least in English, and I mainly did it because I wanted a third term in the second clause - both because three is a powerful number in writing (e.g.: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness," which has a set of three nested within a set of three), and also to complete the parallelism from the clause before the semicolon. There's also the consonance created when following "dazzle" with "razzmatazz".
CSnyder There's also the consonance created when following "dazzle" with "razzmatazz".
I'm sorry, I don't understand what you mean by "consonance" created when following "dazzle" with "razzmatazz"?

Do you mean that it's customary to precede the word "razzmatazz" with "dazzle"?
'Consonance' just means that the two words sound relatively alike- and so generally sound good, when put together. In this instance, this is because of the double-z, present in both words. : )
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
chivalryIs it correct to say to blind someone over something???
"To blind" is figurative.
If you're asking about the preposition, "to blind someone to something" is more common.

It would be possible to blind someone over something with the right context, but it would be unusual.

In "She blinded me over X," X would be the reason she blinded me, not the thing she made me unable to see.

She blinded me to the problems our relationship would surely face in the future.

It could be either a deliberate or an involuntary act on her part.
chivalry
CSnyder There's also the consonance created when following "dazzle" with "razzmatazz".
I'm sorry, I don't understand what you mean by "consonance" created when following "dazzle" with "razzmatazz"?
Do you mean that it's customary to precede the word "razzmatazz" with "dazzle"?
[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_consonance ]Consonance is the repetition of a consonant sound.[/url]
Hi

In UK sport we say "He played a blinder"

I believe it first meant that the sportsman played so rapidly and so skillfully that the opponents could not see where he was coming from

However, it's now used to mean any good sporting performance: "He's played a blinder all season"

[= He's played exceptionally well]

Best regards, Dave
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more