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(1) It is likely that she'll go.

(2) It seems to be likely she'll go.

A CGEL handbook states that the dummy "It" in the (1) is an ordinary subject and that the dummy "It" in the (2) is a raised subject.

My questions are:

Is the dummy "It" in It seems to be likely she'll go raised from It is likely that she'll go? Or, is it raised from the non-finite clause to be likely she'll go?

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anonymousIs the dummy "It" in It seems to be likely she'll go raised from It is likely that she'll go?

Yes.

anonymousOr, is it raised from the non-finite clause to be likely she'll go?

No.

Maybe I don't understand the question, but how can "it" be raised from a clause that doesn't even contain the word "it"?

You should wait for other answers.

CJ

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anonymous

(1) It is likely that she'll go.

(2) It seems to be likely she'll go.

A CGEL handbook states that the dummy "It" in the (1) is an ordinary subject and that the dummy "It" in the (2) is a raised subject.

My questions are:

Is the dummy "It" in It seems to be likely she'll go raised from It is likely that she'll go? Or, is it raised from the non-finite clause to be likely she'll go?

It seems to be likely she'll go.

In this it-cleft extraposition construction the "it" is in a higher clause than the one with "be", and is thus said to be a 'raised subject'.

anonymousIn this it-cleft construction the "it" is in a higher clause than the one with "be", and is thus said to be a 'raised subject'.

Could you please define the notion of "the higher clause" regarding the raised subject?

I understand that there is a 'lower clause' as a counterpart of the 'higher clause'.

Also, if you could, in what way does that sentence illustrate a cleft construction?

CJ

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anonymous
anonymousIn this it-cleft construction the "it" is in a higher clause than the one with "be", and is thus said to be a 'raised subject'.

Could you please define the notion of "the higher clause" regarding the raised subject?

I understand that there is a 'lower clause' as a counterpart of the 'higher clause'.

It seems to be likely she'll go.

The higher, matrix, clause is the one containing the subordinate infinitival "be" clause, i.e. the "seems" clause.

Syntactically "it" is located in the matrix clause, but semantically it belongs solely in the embedded "be" clause.

The meaning is very close to that of It seemingly is likely that she'll go, where we have the adverb "seemingly" instead of the catenative verb "seem".

A useful thing to remember is that dummy "it" cannot function as ordinary (not raised) subject to a catenative verb, so we can't say *It wants to be likely that she'll go.

Note that I mistakenly called this a cleft construction, whereas it is in fact a catenative construction with extrapositional "it".

anonymousNote that I called this a cleft construction, whereas it is in fact a catenative construction with extrapositional "it".

Thanks for the reply.

Yes, it is a catenative construction, but I wonder whether it is a fronted "It" instead of the extrapositional one.

anonymous
anonymousNote that I called this a cleft construction, whereas it is in fact a catenative construction with extrapositional "it".

Thanks for the reply.

Yes, it is a catenative construction, but I wonder whether it is a fronted "It" instead of the extrapositional one.

It seems to be likely she'll go.

I don't think there's any doubt that it's an extraposition construction:

That she'll go seems to be likely.............................. [Basic version]

It seems to be likely that she'll go........................... [Version with extraposition]


Notice that the subject position in the extraposed version is filled with dummy "it", and the subordinate that clause is moved to the end of the clause as an extraposed subject.

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