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1repose
1 a: to lie at rest b: to lie dead ''reposing in state'' c: to remain still or concealed

What does state mean in the context of the above definition? I couldn't find any definition of state which fits in the above context. Please help.
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Hi,

1repose
1 a: to lie at rest b: to lie dead reposing in state c: to remain still or concealed

What does state mean in the context of the above definition? I couldn't find any definition of state which fits in the above context.


A king dies. They dress him in his crown and his wonderful royal robes. They put him, in his coffin which may even be open, in an important public place like a cathedral, so that ordinary people can walk past in a respectful way.

He is now said to be lieing in state. ie in his full royal manner.

The term is usually used of royalty, leaders of their country, high dignitaries.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive1repose
1 a: to lie at rest b: to lie dead reposing in state c: to remain still or concealed

What does state mean in the context of the above definition? I couldn't find any definition of state which fits in the above context.


A king dies. They dress him in his crown and his wonderful royal robes. They put him, in his coffin which may even be open, in an important public place like a cathedral, so that ordinary people can walk past in a respectful way.

He is now said to be lieing in state. ie in his full royal manner.

The term is usually used of royalty, leaders of their country, high dignitaries.
Hi Clive

Can some other word be used instead of dress in dress him in his crown? I certainly trust you but it just confuses me because dress is mostly associated with clothes, as far as I know.

lieing, is this a spelling error, usual spelling is lying?

leaders of their country, it's their which is troubling me. What does their stand for?
Hi,

Can some other word be used instead of dress in dress him in his crown? I certainly trust you but it just confuses me because dress is mostly associated with clothes, as far as I know. I used the word 'dress' loosely, to avoid having to type two verb forms. If I wanted to be a little more precise, I might say

They put his crown on his head and dress him in his wonderful royal robes.

lieing, is this a spelling error, usual spelling is lying? Yes.

leaders of their country, it's their which is troubling me. What does their stand for?
It refers to 'leaders'.

Best wishes, Clive